Knitting Blog

3 Ways to Cast On for the Magic Loop

For many knitters, the hardest part of mastering the magic loop is getting the cast-on just right. It can be a bit tricky to get the hang of, but once you learn how to cast on for magic loop, you’ll want to knit almost everything using this method!

When knitting in the round, the beginning of your work can either be open (creating a hollow tube, like for cowls) or closed (creating a concave shape, like for hats or toe-up socks). Read on to learn a few methods for both options.

Knit Smarter With Magic Loop

Master Magic Loop!

Join popular knitting instructor Lorilee Beltman for hours of high-def, close-up instruction on knitting the magic loop.Check It Out

Open cast-on for magic loop knitting

Use this option for cowls, hats that start at the cuff, fingerless mitts and more.

Step 1: Cast on

Casting on the required number of stitches

On to one end of the circular needle, cast on the number of stitches your pattern calls for. You can use any cast-on method you like, such as the long-tail cast-on or thumb cast-on.

Step 2:

Slide all the cast-on stitches to the middle of the cable connecting the circular needles. Find the center point of the stitches (so if you cast on 20 stitches, find the point where you have 10 stitches on each side).

Find the middle point in the stitches

Gently separate the stitches at that point and grab onto the cable. Bend the cable and pull it up a bit between the stitches.

Step 3:

knitting the magic loop

Slide both halves of the stitches back down to the two needles.

Step 4:

Turn the needles for the magic loop method

Turn the needles so that the needle tips are horizontal and pointing to the right. The needle with the first cast-on stitch should be closest to you.

At this point, try to hold the yarn tail out of the way so you don’t confuse it with the working yarn.

Step 5:

Pull on the needle closest to you so that the stitches slide on to the cable. You should be able to work with the needle.

Working needles for the magic loop method

And now all your stitches are in place for you to begin knitting! If you need a little more guidance, check out this post.

Closed cast-ons for magic loop knitting

Use these options for toe-up socks, top-down hats and other projects that only have one opening.

Judy’s magic cast-on

Judy's Magic Cast On

This cast-on is called “magic” for good reason! In this method, you cast stitches onto both circular needles. The stitches are interlocked, resulting in a seamless start for your project.

Get the full tutorial.

Turkish cast-on

Turkish Cast On

Similar to Judy’s magic cast-on, this interesting-looking cast-on puts stitches on both needles and results in a seamless start. Some knitters find this method a little less fiddly, since you don’t have to maneuver the yarn between the needles.

Get the full tutorial here.

 

Knit Smarter With Magic Loop

Master Magic Loop!

Join popular knitting instructor Lorilee Beltman for hours of high-def, close-up instruction on knitting the magic loop.Check It Out

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