How to Foundation Single Crochet (FSC) and Ditch the Chain

Single crochet stitch

The foundation single crochet stitch (FSC) is a total game changer. Gone are the days of creating long chains and then going back and working into the chain before you start the first row — with FSC, you cut straight to the chase, working the chain and your first row of single crochets in one step.

There are so many reasons to love foundation single crochet. Missing stitches (which is all too common with a long chain) is nearly impossible, the stitches are easy to see and FSC has the same tension as the rest of your project for a super-stretchy edge.

Pro Tip: You can use the FSC stitch in any pattern, even one that doesn’t call for it. Just do away with the chain and begin with the first row, creating the same number of foundation stitches as the row calls for. So, for instance, if the first row calls for 100 single crochet stitches, skip the chain and make 100 FSCs instead.

An FSC is a bit like a Tunisian edge stitch, if you know how to Tunisian crochet. You’ll be working vertically instead of horizontally for the first part of the project. The chain will be on the left side of the vertical strip (if you’re right-handed) and the first row of single crochet will appear on the right side. Got it? Let’s do this!

Foundation Single Crochet

Level: Easy

What You Need

  • Yarn
  • Crochet hook
  • Stitch marker
  • Instructions

    Beginning crochet stitch

    1. Begin with a slip knot on your crochet hook, then chain two.

    Crocheting

    2. Insert your hook into the first chain stitch.

    Crocheting with a hook

    3. Yarn over and pull up one loop. You should have two loops on the hook when you complete this step.

    Looping a stitch

    4. Yarn over and pull the yarn through the first loop on your hook. The yarn you just pulled through is actually a chain stitch. Go ahead and add a removable stitch marker to this chain stitch so you don’t forget.

    Crocheting

    5. Yarn over and pull through both of the loops on your hook to make a single crochet. You should have one loop on the hook when you complete this step. You’ve just finished your first foundation crochet stitch.

    Crocheting stitch

    6. Remember how you made a chain in Step 4? That’s the chain you’ll now be working into next. Insert your crochet hook into the space between the chain and the single crochet.

    Crocheting with a hook

    7. Yarn over and pull up one loop. You should have two loops on your hook. Yarn over and pull the yarn through the first loop on your hook. You’ve just made your next chain stitch. Now’s a good time to move the stitch marker and place it around this chain stitch (as in the photo above).

    Crocheting with a hook

    8. To finish the second foundation crochet stitch, yarn over and pull through both loops on the hook.

    9. Repeat steps 6 through 8 until you have the number of stitches you need for your project.

    Finished single crochet

    When you’ve completed the first row, give yourself a high five and turn your work. You’re ready to move onto the second row, whatever that may be.

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    13 Responses to “How to Foundation Single Crochet (FSC) and Ditch the Chain”
    1. Dawn
      Dawn

      Fsc is such bullshit. Everyone makes it sound soo easy. Well, its not. I have tried for months now. This shit is crap. I have watched all the videos and wrote everything down step by step. I have used different yarns thinking maybe its that. No, its not. Its just another shitty way for those crocheted to lord it over those like me who were born stupid trash. Its a trap. Those of you who can, will continue to preen over the rest of us. Been that way for always. So what else is new.

      Reply
      • Belinda Baker
        Belinda Baker

        I understand your frustration. It took a good while for it to click for me. I can try to show you one on one somehow, zoom maybe? It is worth learning for sure because trying to make anything with starting chains is so awful.

        Reply
      • Bee
        Bee

        Why so hostile? What works for one person doesn’t work for another but that doesn’t make those who can lords and those who can’t trash.

        Reply
      • ANNETTE A FUNSETH
        ANNETTE A FUNSETH

        Don’t give up. I’ve been crocheting since I was 8 (51 years now) and I have so much trouble with this stitch. I’ve struggled it with it for years and continue to have trouble. I have discovered that some videos are better than others. Keep trying.

        Reply
      • Ronnie
        Ronnie

        Chillax sweetheart! There will always be someone out there that is trying to re-invent the wheel. If trying a new technique is too challenging and/or frustrating, just keep it simple and stick with the old tried and true method! I have been crocheting for 50+ years now and still like to use the original chain a row method! I also like to, from time to time, challenge myself by learning new methods! It’s all about what you’re comfortable with. Crocheting (like all crafts) is an art form of self expression. When one immerses themself in a craft, it should be pleasurable and relaxing; not stressful! Enjoy yourself and keep on crocheting!

        Reply
    2. Joan
      Joan

      Trying to get a foundation row started using chenille yarn but difficult to see stitches ( should tell you I had a stroke and am working with a right hand that doesn’t want to cooperate always-help

      Reply
    3. Emily
      Emily

      See the bump at the end?
      I can’t figure out how to do the next row properly or do it in a round with that bump that is definitely not the height of the full stitch.

      Reply
    4. Kendra Sambrana
      Kendra Sambrana

      I have made my fsc but i am not sure what spot to start counting on. the first stitch or does the 2 chain of the ch 2 count as the first stitch. sorry i am so confused about it.

      Reply
      • Nancy L Batterson
        Nancy L Batterson

        You will flip your work to begin the second row and your needle will be on top. The stitches should be clear to see and count.

        Reply