Alta

from Amy Herzog Designs

Alta Pattern

$7.00

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Knitting: Alta
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Pattern Details:

Pattern Details

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Category:

Knitting

Type:

Clothing

Fit:

Women, Petite, Tall, Plus-sized

Item:

Sweater

Skill Level:

intermediate skill level requirement Advanced

Basic Skills Necessary:

  • Knit, purl, increase, decrease, CO, BO, follow written instructions, follow charted instructions

Pattern Description:

All photographs copyright Jonathan Herzog 2013 and used with permission. Technical Editing by Elizabeth Sullivan.

Alta is what happened when I tried to imagine an updated version of the old-school ski sweater, done in a way that flatters the figure. It has a few modern updates, but will still keep you toasty warm all winter. The luscious wool-silk blend in a large, modern turtleneck positively cuddles your neck. The longer sleeves do the same for your wrists. The cables are intricate enough to be interesting but aren't fussy, lending a classic look to this longer sweater. Vertical waist shaping darts keep everything supremely flattering. The combination of lace and cablework gives the sweater a somewhat delicate feel.

And of course, the yarn can't be beat. Spirit Trail Fibreworks Birte is a glorious blend of wool and silk that lends just the right drape, color depth, and sheen to this classic sweater. Should you desire to substitute yarn, please choose a yarn that produces a slightly springy, drapey fabric at gauge.

Alta is constructed in pieces from the bottom up, with set-in sleeves. The neckline is picked up and worked after seaming.

Vertical darts enable easy customization to fit your needs. Should you desire less waist shaping than specified, either omit the shaping rows entirely, or omit/reduce only the shaping on the front of the sweater. Bustier women can work more increases on the front of the sweater, and not in the back. Extra stitches should be decreased into the neckline.

As with all patterns, compare the schematic against your own measurements and make alterations as necessary.

Thanks so much for your support!

Gauge:

22 sts and 30 rows = 4'' in St st

Sizing / Finished Measurements:

  • Bust: 301?2 (32, 34, 361?2, 381?2, 40, 42, 461?2, 50, 541?2)"/77.5 (81.5, 86.5, 92.5, 98, 101.5, 106.5, 118, 127, 138.5) cm
  • Length: 211?2 (221?4, 223?4, 231?4, 24, 241?2, 25, 253?4, 261?2, 27)"/54.5 (56.5, 58, 59, 61, 62, 63.5, 65.5, 67.5, 68.5) cm

Materials:

  • 5 (5, 5, 6, 6, 6, 7, 7, 8, 8) hanks Spirit Trail Fiberworks Birte
  • US #6/4 mm straight or circular needles, or size needed to obtain gauge
  • One US #6/4 mm circular needle, 24'' or shorter, for neckline
  • One US #7/4.5 mm circular needle, 24'' or shorter, for neck- line
  • One US #8/5 mm circular needle, 24'' or shorter, for neckline ?

You Will Also Need:

  • Stitch markers, stitch holder, cable needle, darning needle

Preferred Brand/Yarn:

Spirit Trail Fibreworks Birte

Colorway:

Graphite

About Designer

About Designer

Amy Herzog on craftsy.com

Amy is a Boston-based knitwear designer and author of the book "Knit to Flatter" (STC Craft, 2013) and the popular "Fit to Flatter" tutorials. She teaches classes on creating sweaters that perfectly fit and flatter your figure around the country, and is passionate about ensuring all of us love to wear our hand-knits.
Her patterns have been featured in Twist Collective, KnitScene and the book ...

Amy is a Boston-based knitwear designer and author of the book "Knit to Flatter" (STC Craft, 2013) and the popular "Fit to Flatter" tutorials. She teaches classes on creating sweaters that perfectly fit and flatter your figure around the country, and is passionate about ensuring all of us love to wear our hand-knits.
Her patterns have been featured in Twist Collective, KnitScene and the book "Knitting it Old School." You can also find her self-published designs on her website, amyherzogdesigns.com.

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