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First muslin - top needs to be redone.

Created in this Craftsy Course

The Couture Dress taught by Susan Khalje

From creating a muslin to adjusting fit and hand-stitching hems, Couturier Susan Khalje guides you step-by-step through couture sewing techniques!

Other projects made as part of this class:

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Here are some details about my project:
Category Sewing
Type Clothing
Sizing Women
Style Classic, Traditional
flynntsang on craftsy.com

What materials did you use? Not decided yet - still working on the muslin.

flynntsang on craftsy.com

What are you most proud of? We'll see when I'm done. Right now I'm proud that I'm not despairing on the poor fit of my muslin and thinking this trial run is a good thing.

flynntsang on craftsy.com

What advice would you give someone starting this project? I watched everything through before buying anything. Granted, I multi-tasked through most of it the first time, but it was helpful to become familiar with the course material. For me, the big missing link is sizing. Figuring out your correct dress size and then making adjustments (out in my case) was a huge step forward. You don't want good craftsmanship to be wasted on a poor fit. Here's what helped me: http://www.nancyzieman.com/blog/sewing-general/sewing-and-quilting-questions-answers%E2%80%94choosing-the-right-sewing-pattern-size/. Also, a good "foundation garment" goes a long way to improving the overall look of a fine dress. I wear Rago Shapewear and heels while doing my fitting so I can imagine how the final dress might look when I wear it out in the real world.

flynntsang on craftsy.com

I'm looking forward to this class. Working on other things to improve in my sewing first :)

11/28/2012 Flag

FYI: necklines can be transplanted from one pattern to another. That said, you're doing great. The muslin is where you learn what works and make the mistakes. I've been sewing for decades and making a muslin from a new-to-me pattern is the law! When that's done, making up the dress you'll wear goes faster and better, and you're sewing with confidence. Which is what you want (well, you want a dress that looks good on you, vs you looking good in the dress). Good on ya', gal!

11/28/2012 Flag

:) What a nice community this is!

11/28/2012 Flag

wow... I'm inspired to try this class now. Thanks for all the tips here gals!

11/28/2012 Flag

Looks good! One piece of advice which probably doesn't need to be said but since I didn't follow it myself I'll just reiterate it. :) Be satisfied with the muslin before you start your dress. I took a lot of time with mine, but was sick of it by the time I'd finally fitted the bodice and skirt, so tried them on separately, and since they both fit I didn't bother to baste them together and take a final look. Well, as you might imagine, I've had to do a lot of adjustments to the fashion fabric at the seam where the bodice and skirt come together. It's a lot easier, and less stressful, to get it right on the muslin first. I also agree with the comment someone else made about princess seams. Give those a try next time - I think you'll like them. Hope this has been helpful!

11/30/2012 Flag

Thanks for the note! It's really good to share tips - I appreciate it! I'm going to retire V8765 and make a dress from V8648 (the one used for the class).

12/02/2012 Flag

I think you're off to a good start. Keep tweaking. What pattern are you using?

12/04/2012 Flag

Vogue 8765 - there aren't enough seams for tweaking. I'm retiring this project and will use the class pattern now that it's arrived. Keep a look out for my next project!

12/04/2012 Flag