SethMorris on craftsy.com

Deer (maybe to be named Stephen)

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Created in this Craftsy Course

Amigurumi: Woodland Animals taught by Stacey Trock

Brand-new crocheters will learn the basics, while crochet veterans will enjoy making whimsical and cuddly bears, deers, raccoons and bluebirds.

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Here are some details about my project:
Category Crocheting
Sizing Other
SethMorris on craftsy.com

What materials did you use? Plymouth Yarn Encore in some brownish color for the body Cascade Yarns Eco Duo (colorway 1704, a variegated brown-and-very-dark-brown) for hooves, choosing sections that weren't too close to the body in color Cascade Yarns Cascade 220 solid white for antlers and tail tip A pink section of Be Sweet Bambino Taffy "Sweet and Sour" for the nose

SethMorris on craftsy.com

What are you most proud of? I came extremely close to following the pattern: Not only did I refrain from adding to the design in a way which could reduce what I learned from the project but I followed the stitch count more closely than i thought I would. The shaping on the snout was quite intimidating.

SethMorris on craftsy.com

What advice would you give someone starting this project? Things I learned (in addition to the lessons in the project design): Check your hook size and check it again. On the head I have nice, tight stitches giving a good, hard head, but the body is way too much stuffing. Much like me! On long, thin tubes or small balls like the antler parts, make sure you have the side you want showing from the beginning. Using variegated yarn is fun. Using it for contrast with a related yarn is risky. I made two additional arms that had to be thrown back in the pool, one for being a round too wide and one for having the hoof match the arm so closely that my GF wasn't sure I'd done a color change it all until she felt it. I'd probably stitch the arms and legs on *after* the head if I were doing it again, since I had to tear out the head stitching twice, once to reposition it by 3 stitches and once because my GF pointed out that the body was overstuffed by way too much. Even without the head, I put the legs and arms on and neither of us noticed how off they were until the head was attached. I did better matching the two legs together and the two arms together by sight than I did by making sure I followed the pattern perfectly. I would love to have confidence that my counts were right, but they weren't exact and matching the second one by sight was more effective. It's a compensation strategy for my limitations, but it's good to know. Put stuffing in to check the eyes before locking them down. They seemed *perfect* to both of us before stuffing and they are clearly a little too off. I wound up not able to stuff the long, thin antler piece, but it seems to work ok. I don't know what I could have done differently with it.

SethMorris on craftsy.com