Crocheting Blog

The Finishing Touch: Adding a Border to Tunisian Crochet

Adding a border to Tunisian crochet projects takes them from finished to professionally polished. Use these tips and tricks to frame blankets, washcloths and much more. 

Planning for a Tunisian crochet border

Traditional crochet borders can easily be added to Tunisian crochet fabric. If a border is in the plans for your project, there are a few things to keep in mind before the very first stitch.

The unique construction of Tunisian crochet makes adding this finishing touch much different than traditional crochet. Take these notes into account to ensure even, attractive edgings:

1. Adjust the crochet hook size

Tunisian crochet is worked with a hook much larger than what the ball band might suggest. (Learn more about picking the right sized hook for Tunisian crochet here.)

When it comes time to work the border, adjust the hook size to what is suggested by the ball band or slightly larger. This makes sure the gauge of the border matches closely with the gauge of the fabric.  

2. Remember, there are no corner stitches

Because Tunisian crochet projects are worked in rows with a forward pass and a return pass, the fabric does not have any obvious corner stitches like traditional crochet squares that are worked in the round.

This might present a problem, as borders are worked in rounds around the fabric all in one direction. Luckily, there’s an easy way around this: During the first round of your border, chain 2 or 3 stitches when turning the corner.

3. Keep the edges even

Tunisian crochet is notorious for having bumpy or loopy edges. But with a few tricks to keep things neat, the edges of Tunisian crochet fabric create the perfect base for a beautiful border.

Make a few simple changes to the foundation row, forward pass and bind off row, and you’ll create nice single crochet–like edges that are easy to work into. Find out how right here.

4. Add to the foundation chain

Some border stitch patterns may require a certain number of stitches to achieve the perfect look. More intricate patterns may suggest a specific multiple of edge stitches.

Similar to traditional crochet, one additional chain must be added to the beginning chain to ensure the stitch count is accurate. Account for this when planning the body of the project and double check the count of the foundation edge after the first few rows. 

3 Tunisian crochet borders to try

Ready to add a crochet border to your Tunisian crochet projects? Try these three samples — my go-to favorites for everything from coasters to throw blankets. 

Option 1: The crab stitch

The crab stitch is a traditional single crochet worked in backward rows, from left to right. It’s highly textured and can be worked over any number of stitches. The crab stitch really pops when crocheted in a contrasting color.

Here’s how:

  • Slip stitch the border color into the second stitch to the left of the corner. Chain 1. Single crochet in the same stitch.
  • Single crochet in the next stitch to the right. (This will seem very odd at first, but it’s easy to catch the rhythm.)
  • Chain 2 for the corner. Rotate the work counter clockwise.
  • Crab stitch in each stitch to the next corner; chain 2 for the corner.
  • Repeat these steps until the border is on all sides. Cut yarn and weave in all ends. 

Option 2: Simple peaks

The simple peaks border is an easy way to add sweetness to an otherwise modest Tunisian crochet design. The collection of single crochet and chain stitches should be worked over multiples of 2 stitches  + 1.

Here’s how:

  • Slip stitch the border color in the first stitch to the left of the corner.
  • (Single crochet, chain 3, single crochet) in every other stitch to corner.
  • Single crochet in the stitch before the corner. Chain 3 for the corner. Single crochet in the stitch after the corner.
  • (Single crochet, chain 3, single crochet) in ever other stitch to corner.
  • Repeat these steps until the border is on all sides. Cut yarn and weave in all ends. 

Option 3: Magic blocks

The magic blocks border is so named because the stunning result is made using a surprisingly simple technique. The base is built with a combination of single and double crochet stitches, then a foundation single crochet cord is threaded through the work. Each edge should be a multiple of 4 stitches +1. 

Round 1:

  • Slip stitch the border color in the first stitch to the left of the corner.
  • Single crochet in the same stitch and each stitch to the corner.
  • Chain 2 for the corner. Rotate work clockwise.
  • Single crochet in each stitch across the edge and chain 2 for the corner.
  • Repeat these steps until all edges are done. Slip stitch into the beginning single crochet. 

Round 2:

  • Chain 4 (counts as double crochet + chain 1). Skip 1 single crochet.
  • (Double crochet, ch 1, skip 1 stitch) to corner.
  • (Double crochet, chain 1) 3 times in corner chain space.
  • Repeat these steps until all edges are done. Slip stitch in the 3rd chain of the beginning chain 4.

Round 3:

  • Chain 1, single crochet in each double crochet and chain space around, placing 3 single crochet in the second double crochet of each corner.
  • Repeat these steps until all edges are done. Slip stitch into the beginning single crochet. Cut yarn. Weave in ends.

Finishing:

  • With contrasting color, create a foundation single crochet cord the length needed to weave through the spaces in the border.
  • Weave the cord through the spaces, weave the ends of the cord together, cut yarn, and weave in all ends. 
Tunisian Crochet Class

Beginner’s Guide to Tunisian Crochet

Combine the best of two needlecrafts to create three cozy accessories that look like they’re knit — all using a single crochet hook! Watch FREE in Craftsy Unlimited Get the Class

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