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The Makers of Craftsy: Meet Shaun

Meet Shaun – Craftsy’s Director of Partnerships by day and a woodworker by night. Shaun’s woodworking journey began about three years ago when he was looking for a cabinet to display his growing record collection. Nothing like it existed at the time, so he decided to make his own.

Shaun Beall Makers of Craftsy

“I love seeing something evolve from a vision in my head to something in the world,” Shaun says. So after watching a number of online tutorials and classes (fun fact: He actually took a Craftsy class before he started working on our team), he was able to build the cabinet, turning his idea into reality.

Shaun Beall's Record Cabinet

Shaun’s woodshop overlooks the mountainous forests of Evergreen, Colorado, and it goes without saying that he couldn’t be in a more perfect setting for making things out of all that nature has provided him. In fact, his work is often inspired by his surroundings, following the natural curves and lines of the wood with which he’s working.

Shaun Putting a Record in His Cabinet

Here at Craftsy, we often celebrate the act of making in itself, but Shaun’s favorite parts of the process are the beginning and the end. Perhaps that explains why he was drawn to woodwork in the first place. “Every piece of wood has a story,” he says. And this is especially true considering the wood he’s working with started off somewhere else and somehow, some way, ended up in his shop.

What’s your favorite part of making? Share in our comments below! And don’t forget to follow us on Instagram at @BeCraftsy to read more about our makers.

4 Comments

Margaret-Rose Stringer

-Enjoying ‘meeting’ the staff – even if they’re all young enough to be my … uhh … grandchildren ? Sighh …
What an amazing amount of talent ! – congratulations all ’round.

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lenora

I am like Shaun about liking how a piece of wood starts out and how it looks at the end. I love finding odd shapes of wood and making jewelry out of them, mostly necklaces. No two comes out the same. I love reading the stories about the people that make up Craftsy and how they got started. Thanks for all you offer.

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Elaine Murszewski

Heehee In the email Shaun’s woodshop is listed as a “woodship”. I’ll always remember Shaun!

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Steven P Barrett

Simple, brief and to the point in a friendly manner. He leaves no doubt that while he’s taken control of this blog, he’s the first to admit he has a lot to learn regarding woodworking. Anybody who’s only been at this for just three years is very much a beginner and Shaun’s openness about his relative lack of woodworking experience is a refreshing change. Heck, I’ve been at it for more than forty years and admit I can still botch a 45 degree angle cut. You’d think this would be a routine easy cut. Just like in golf, the good hits and putts only look easy because a lot of hours and beaucoup buckets worth of lost balls went into making things appear so easily. And also like golf, it’s the amount of attention we pay to the tiny and almost insignificant details that make the difference between crafting a so-so piece of artwork and getting the “wow’s” and “will ya look at this?” comments that in many ways are far more valuable than our earnings from our labors. I build Nativity stalls pretty much like the way they’re made in Germany. (Well, being a military dependent, I had plenty of exposure and while I couldn’t “do anything with the exposure,” the visions and impressions of the amount of work and detailing the Bavarians put into their work in Oberammergau stayed with me for life. I’m 65 and they still grab my perennial childlike spirit of Christmas. Take this from the French artist, Delacroix and you won’t go wrong. I found it in a NYT’s interview with historian David McCullough who said the French artist admitted putting the added work in to the “details” was what increased the power of imagination of his works on his viewers. Now nothing has captured my imagination than the joy of finally getting the knack of mastering that deceptively simple 45 degree cut for picture framing.

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