Knitting Blog

15 Problems Every Knitter Can Relate To

Knitting Problems

Ripping out a sweater, finding storage space for yarn, piling up UFOs — how many of these knitting problems can you relate to?

Knitting problems. We all have them, and we love to complain about them to each other. (That's what stitch groups are for, right?)

While knitting problems are minor compared to life's other problems, it can still be frustrating to deal with, say, a sweater you spent half the year knitting that won't even fit over your head.

Let's take a minute to giggle over a few of the major predicaments we can all relate to. Been there, done that.

Freebie alert! Solve all your knitting problems with FREE downloadable guides and mini-video classes »

1. Running out of yarn at the end of a project.

You're so close to the end of a project and then — ugh — you run out of yarn. All you can do is hop over to the yarn store and cross your fingers that the color isn't discontinued.

Fleurette Lace Pullover

Fleurette Lace Pullover free pattern by Craftsy member Universal Yarn

2. Spending hours on a sweater only to discover that it does not fit.

How many sweaters have you unraveled in your knitting lifetime because they don't fit? (Psst! This free guide on knitting sweaters will help next time.)

3. Gifting a knitted project and never seeing the recipient wear it.

We don't expect a thank you card, but hey, it would be nice to see the baby wrapped in that blanket at least once.

4. Losing knitting needles.

I have two size 10 double-pointed needles. Hm, where could the others be hiding?

5. Knitting needles tied up in other projects.

Sometimes lost knitting needles are hanging out on UFOs. Funnily enough, this rarely motivates us to actually complete the UFO.

6. Two words: wrist pain.

Hours of knitting can make your wrists, fingers and even arms feel crummy. Try these Hand Stretches for Knitters next time.

Malt Free blanket pattern

Malt free blanket pattern by Craftsy member Tin Can Knits

7. Not finishing a gift on time.

Clearly it was the baby's fault for being born a week early.

8. Losing your place in a pattern.

You picked up a pattern you were working on last winter (or was the winter before?) and now you can't remember where you left off or even what size you were knitting. Next time, attach these 5 notes to your UFO before you store it.

9. Not getting gauge.

You went up a needle size. You went down a needle size. You re-watched Improve Your Knitting with Patty Lyons and tried different knitting styles and methods. You even substituted a new yarn, but the numbers still aren't matching up.

10. Pets messing with your in-progress project.

Cat, please keep your paws to yourself. Also, that in-progress sweater is not your new napping spot.

Frogging or ripping knitting stitches

11. Messing up and frogging.

Sometimes you just have to rip it and start over. And, oh, how it hurts your little knitting heart.

12. Yarn that feels better in the skein than it does after you knit it.

It felt perfectly lovely all wrapped up, but then you started working with it and discovered that you aren't crazy about it. Is this even the same yarn?

13. Totally ruining your monthly budget on yarn.

But it was my birthday/Christmas/Friday/[insert any special occasion here]!

14. Running out of places to store your yarn.

You knew you were getting desperate when you gave away a whole drawer full of clothing to make room for yarn. See if one of these 5 Ways to Organize and Store Knitting Supplies can help. Just have too much yarn? Do some Stashbusting with Craftsy instructor Clara Parkes.

15. Tangled yarn.

This knitting problem goes hand in hand with the storage problem. You might devote just as much time to untangling the yarn as you do to actually knitting the project!

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Did we forget any knitting problems? Leave your most common knitting frustrations in the comments so we can all commiserate.

22 Comments

Rene Hendrikz

Ha ha that was fun to read and insightful. Thx for all the solutions yiu made my day. There’s one thing I would like to add: I have a problem with knitting needles when the size number fades or end comes off completely. Do you have suggestions ?

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Jaden

The numbers on my needles are ingraved – you don’t feel it at all (the brand I use is ChiaoGoo).

However especially on the bamboo ones in the smaller sizes they are hard to read. I use a needle gauge for that, though most oft the time they are stored in a pouch and the size is written on the “slot” they fit into.

You could make something like that for yourself, depending on what kind of needles you use.

I’ve seen a hanger made from old (wooden) yarn spools for circular needles. Pouches work great for interchangeable needles or DPNs.

Or else the needle gauge which is always good to have… 😉

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Jaden

*engraved (of course)

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Marion

I had a big problem with this! Finally I took a sharpie marker and made dots on the needle. A size 6 would look lik

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Marion

Sorry, hit the wrong key. A size 6 is marked: xxxxx x. A an 11 is xxxxx xxxxx x. 10 1/2 is tricky. I do 10 marks then make the 1/2 different. Could even be a different color. I’ve had a few wear off but it’s easy to mark them again. Hope this helps.

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Carol

my wooden ones I write the number on its end with a sharpie. you could also put a typed number at the base of a straight needle and seal it on with decoupage?other than that its the needle gauge for my DPN

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Karin

I put some clothes pin on a clothes hanger and wrapped some rubber bands around them. I put the needle size on the clothes pin with a sharpie, then stick one end of the circular needle under the rubber band. This way they are organized, out of the way, and I know the size right away.

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kib

I put clear nail polish over the printed size before I use the needles.

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liz n.

Ah, yes, the mutating yarn! Awhile back, I splurged on a gorgeous wool/silk blend ($30 per skein, ON SALE, eep!) that felt wonderful in hand. It knit up feeling like those green scrubby pads you use for cleaning the gunk off of pots and pans. No wonder so much of it was on sale… I now own the world’s most expensive, albeit gorgeous, dish cloths.

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Chris Lattrel

Do the patterns come with the kits or projects? I don’t have a printer, so I’d need the pattern included.

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Mari Adatha

Happiness is having a SPOUSE who brings home random bags of assorted yarn and says ” look what was on sale? I thought you could do something with this?” I make toys for the kids at church, so a single skein is as equally welcome in the stash as enough for a sweater! Also, said spouse also VOLUNTARILY offers to help untangle those nasty collapsed skeins that are hiding at the bottom of the bins…. Thank you, Angel 😘

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Raven

When I first started knitting fingerless gloves I became mesmorized by the yarn in Michaels and inspired to knit them for everyone. I bought a ton of the yarn. Only to discover months later it wasn’t easy to knit with and it gets pilly quickly but you can’t use a lint shaver because the yarn is so delicate you will most likely cut it.

Now what. I have this yarn but I feel any thing I try to make I will only beanie to think of frustration. Do I donate the yarn? Or is that just cruel to put anyone else through the same anguish? Lol.

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Raven

Beanie=be able

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ANNA

I HAVE BEEN KNITTING FOR 40+ YEARS AND OVER THAT TIME HAVE BUILT UP QUITE A STASH. I STARTED KNITTING SQUARES OF DIFFERENT COLORS THEN “SEWING” THEM TOGETHER TO MAKE CRAZY QUILT LAP THROWS.
I LIKE TO GIVE THEM OUT RANDOMLY SO I DON’T HAVE THEM HANGING AROUND FOR VERY LONG. THIS IS A GREAT WAY TO USE UP THE ODDS AND ENDS OF SKEINS.
BUT WITH THE COWL CRAZE GOING ON YOU MIGHT LIKE TO JUST WHIP UP A FEW OF THEM AND HAND THEM OUT AS CHRISTMAS GIFTS, THEY KNIT UP FAST AND ALMOST EVERYONE IS WEARING THEM. AS FOR MYSELF, I WILL STICK TO SCARVES IN ALL COLORS AND LENGTHS.

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Jean Livingston

I am knitting scarves for my sons for their winter motorcycle riding. They are curling up on the sides. Even after blocking and then using a steam iron, they are still curling. What am I doing wrong???

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Christine

Hi! If you did 3-4 knit sts at the beginning and end of each row, it won’t curl. All stockinette will always curl. So on the purl side you would have kkkppppppppppppppppkkk.

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Jean Livingston

Is there a way to fix the curled edges of these scarves?? I am talking after the project is finished. The kids of course took a picture of him with the scarf around his neck and I can see it is curled already. Arrrrrrgggghhhhhh!!!!

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Lorene

I’m looking for the correct way to sew seams together. I never seem to be satisfied the way I do it and I’ve used different methods throughout my knitting life.

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Bertha

I have problems with edges of an afghan , they are not neat even after finishing the project .

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ashley

Can anyone tell me if there’s anyway to fix this I have to have this blanket done by Christmas for someone who is giving it to there grandmother and I’m freaking out BC I’m nowhere close to finish because I have to keep undoing it. Its a blanket with a M logo on it I cut the yarn and tied it together but it is not doing right at all I can see all the little knots the blue is mixing in with the yellow Im wondering if there is anyway to fix this like go back over those spots later with needle and yarn or am I going to have to undo the whole thing for the 700th time I’m following pattern

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Pat Crew

You haven’t mentioned the problem of instructions in a knitting pattern that are so vague even the best knitters won’t be able to understand them!

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