Knitting Blog

Five Fancy Rib Patterns: Knitted Lace Edition

Want to take your knit rib game to the next level of fancy? Try a lace ribbing pattern! These five pleasing patterns make for great knitted lace edgings for hats, cowls, socks or even sleeves. But who says you have to stick to edges? Use these patterns as an all-over stitch for a wonderfully lacy garment or accessory.

Add an elegant twist to your knitting with one of these five knitted lace edging patterns.

KNIT Five Fancy Ribbing Patterns

Note: All patterns are worked flat. Turn at the end of each row.

Single eyelet rib

Single Eyelet lace Rib

This is the most basic of lace patterns to add to a rib pattern. It consists of vertical rows of eyelets bordered by purl stitches. It lays flat and is very stretchy. The columns of lace and rib are close to even, as it is worked over a K3, P2 pattern.

Multiple of 5 + 2 stitches

  • Row 1 and all odd rows (WS): K2, *P3, K2; rep from * to end.
  • Row 2: P2, *K3, P2; rep from * to end.
  • Row 4: P2, *K2tog, YO, K1, P2; rep from * to end.
  • Row 6: P2, *K3, P2; rep from * to end.
  • Row 8: P2, *K1, YO, SSK, P2; rep from * to end.

Italian chain rib

italian chain rib

This is another simple lace edging to try. It looks pretty good on both the right (RS) and wrong side (WS) because chains are generally reversible. The RS has a ridge of purl stitches between the chains, and the WS has a ridge of knit stitches between them. This is a very stretchy fabric!

TFL: through the front loop
TBL: through the back loop

Multiple of 6 + 2 stitches

  • Row 1 (WS): K2, *P4, K2; rep from * to end.
  • Row 2: P2, *K2tog, YO twice, SSK, P2; rep from * to end.
  • Row 3: K2, *P1, P first YO TFL, P next YO TBL, P1, K2; rep from * to end.
  • Row 4: P2, *YO, SSK, K2tog, YO, P2; rep from * to end.

Double eyelet rib

double eyelet ribbing pattern

This pattern is like its big brother, the single eyelet rib. It is marked by a double row of eyelets, separated by a few purl stitches. The eyelets rest right on top of each other in a straight line. This feels like a very strong pattern for an edging. The stitches around the eyelets resemble cables, so you can easily achieve a fancy look with this simple pattern.

SKP: slip 1, K1, pass slipped stitch over

Multiple of 7 + 2 stitches

  • Row 1 (RS): P2, *K5, P2; rep from * to end.
  • Row 2: K2, *P5, K2; rep from * to end.
  • Row 3: P2, *K2tog, YO, K1, YO, SKP, P2; rep from * to end.
  • Row 4: K2, *P5, K2; rep from * to end.

Cloverleaf eyelet rib

Cloverleaf Rib Pattern

I think this pattern might be my favorite of the ones I’m sharing here. It is kind of like the double eyelet rib, except the eyelets are staggered in a way that creates a cute little cloverleaf. The original pattern I saw only had a single purl stitch between the cloverleaf ridges, but I thought it would look better with two.

Multiple of 6 + 1 stitches

  • Row 1 and all odd rows (WS): K1, *P5, K1; rep from * to end.
  • Row 2: P1, *K1, YO, sl 1, K2tog, PSSO, YO, K1, P1; rep from * to end.
  • Row 4: P1, *K2, YO, SSK, K1, P1; rep from * to end.
  • Row 6: P1, *K5, P1; rep from * to end.

Little shell rib

Little Shells Rib pattern

This rib pattern is less lacy than the others, but I wanted to include it in the collection. It is a beautiful texture that truly looks like little shells! It would be a gorgeous cuff for socks or even sleeves. I think it's absolutely gorgeous in this Madelinetosh Tosh Merino Light! The variegation in the colors really lends itself to the texture.

Multiple of 5 + 2 stitches

  • Row 1 (RS): P2, *K3, P2; rep from * to end.
  • Row 2: K2, *P3, K2; rep from * to end.
  • Row 3: P2, *Sl1, K2tog, PSSO, P2; rep from * to end.
  • Row 4: K2, *[P1, K1, P1] same st, K2; rep from * to end.

That’s it for this edition of Five Fancy Ribs! If you missed the first edition, check here: Five Fancy Ribs: Strong & Sturdy Edition.

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