Paper Crafts Blog

Shake It Off! How to Make Shaker Cards, 3 Ways

Shaker cards are all the rage right now in the world of card making, and today I'll be showing you three different techniques, along with a few tips and tricks, that you can use to create this fun and interactive type of card. So, grab your sequins and let's get shakin'!

3 Ways to Make a Shaker Card

How to make shaker cards

Method #1

Make a Shaker Card : Method 1

Materials

  • Card stock
  • Digital die-cutting machine or metal dies + a manual die-cutting machine
  • Paper cutter
  • Glue pen (I like the Zig Two Way Glue Pen – Fine Tip)
  • Craft glue
  • Clear acetate
  • Shaker filler material (sequins, seed beads, glitter, etc.)
  • Strong hold double-sided adhesive (optional)

Note: You can use a digital die-cutting machine (I used a Silhouette Cameo) or metal dies and a manual die-cutting machine, like the Sizzix Big Shot or We R Memory Keepers Evolution, to cut out the shapes and the shaker window for this card or for any of the cards in this tutorial. I find that 6-8 wall/border shapes work best in giving me enough height that the shaker card filler still has room to move around after the card is assembled.

Make a Shaker Card : Method 1, Step 1

Step 1:

Cut the wall/border shapes from cardstock. Use a glue pen to cover the top of the first shape with glue. Be sure to cover the entire area, as you don't want any open areas where the shaker fill can work its way through after the card is assembled. This is especially important if you're using glitter.

Make a Shaker Card : Method 1, Step 2

Step 2:

Place a second shape on top of the first shape and press together firmly. Repeat Steps 1 and 2 for the remainder of the shapes.

Make a Shaker Card : Method 1, Step 3

Step 3:

Cut your card front and shaker window cutout. I'm making an A2 size card, and I cut the card stock for my card front to 3.75” w x 5” h, slightly smaller than A2 dimensions. I used Silhouette Design Studio to create both the shape for my card front and for the shaker window cutout, so I cut both at the same time.

If you're using metal dies and a manual die-cutting machine, you can cut your card front with a paper cutter and the shaker window cutout in a second step.

Run a line of glue around the outside of the shaker window cutout.

Note: The shaker window cutout should be the same size as the inner diameter of the shape that you're using for your wall/border.

Make a Shaker Card : Method 1, Step 4

Step 4:

Cut a piece of clear acetate to the size of the outer diameter of your wall/border shape. Line the outside of the shaker window cutout with craft glue, center the acetate over the window, and adhere the acetate to the cardstock.

Tip: To help prevent static and to clean the acetate (if needed), you can run a cotton ball covered with rubbing alcohol over both sides of it before attaching it to the card front. Make sure that all of the alcohol has evaporated before you attach it, or things could get messy!

Make a Shaker Card : Method 1, Step 5

Step 5:

Cover the bottom of your shaker card “wall” with strong double-sided adhesive. I prefer the double-sided adhesive to craft glue for this step because there is no dry time involved. Center the wall over the shaker card window and press down firmly.

Make a Shaker Card : Method 1, Step 6

Step 6:

Add shaker card fill to the shaker window area. Use either the double-sided adhesive from Step 5 or craft glue to cover the entire surface of the top of the wall shape. Center your card base over top of the card front and press down firmly. If your card front is smaller than the card base, then centering everything can be tricky. I'll show you a trick in Method 3 below to help you get great alignment every time without any fuss.

Method #2

This method starts off in a very similar fashion to Method #1, but the final steps are a completely different story.

Make a Shaker Card : Method 2

Materials:

  • Card stock
  • Digital die-cutting machine or metal dies + a manual die-cutting machine
  • Paper cutter
  • Glue pen (I like the Zig Two Way Glue Pen – Fine Tip)
  • Craft glue
  • Clear acetate
  • Shaker filler material (sequins, seed beads, glitter, etc.)

How to Make a Shaker Card : Method 2, Step 1

Step 1:

Cut the wall/border shapes from card stock. Use a glue pen to cover the top of the first shape with glue, just like we did in Method #1.

Place a second shape on top of the first shape and press together firmly. Repeat this step for each of the shapes except the final (top) shape.

How to Make a Shaker Card : Method 2, Step 2

Step 2:

Cover the entire bottom surface of the shaker card “wall” with glue or strong double-sided adhesive and adhere it to your card base. I added an embossed card front piece to the card before I glued the wall shape in place for a bit of additional dimension.

Add shaker card fill inside of the shaker card wall.

How to Make a Shaker Card : Method 2, Step 3

Step 3:

Cover the top of the shaker card wall with craft glue and press the die-cut acetate window into place over top.

How to Make a Shaker Card : Method 2, Step 4

Step 4:

Glue the final wall shape, which serves as the cover piece in this case, on top of the acetate. I cut this piece from glitter card stock to add interest.

Method #3

This method uses foam tape in place of the “wall” of cardstock shapes to create the shaker area.

Make a Shaker Card : Method 3

Materials:

  • Card stock
  • Digital die-cutting machine or metal dies + a manual die cutting machine
  • Paper cutter
  • Foam tape
  • Scissors
  • Craft glue
  • Clear acetate
  • Shaker filler material (sequins, seed beads, glitter, etc.)

Make a Shaker Card : Method 3, Step 1

Step 1:

Cut out the card front using either a digital die-cutting machine or metal dies and a manual die-cutting machine. I'm making an A2 size card, and I cut the card stock for my card front to 3.75” w x 5” h, just as in Method #1. Line the outside back of the shaker window cutout with craft glue.

Make a Shaker Card : Method 3, Step 2

Step 2:

Cut a piece of clear acetate about .5” larger than the shaker window cutout. Center the acetate over the back of the cutout and adhere the acetate to the cardstock.

Make a Shaker Card : Method 3, Step 3

Step 3:

Add foam tape around the entire border of the window cutout, making sure that there aren't any gaps in the tape where bits and pieces of filler could work their way through after the card is assembled.

Make a Shaker Card : Method 3, Step 4

Step 4:

Remove the backing from the foam tape. Then, add the shaker fill in the center. You can also add the shaker fill before removing the foam tape backing. It's your preference.

Make a Shaker Card : Method 3, Step 5

Step 5:

Since the card front is smaller than a full size A2 card, it can be tricky (and messy) to try and line things up blindly. To remedy this tricky situation, I place a second card base underneath the card front and line it up just how I want it. Then, I line the main card base up over the second card base and press down firmly. Voila, perfect alignment every time!

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30 Comments

Kelly

Have many ideas for shaker cards! Problem is,where to get acetate sheets??? I have been to every craft store, office supply and even a home depot.Stampin up sells 2 12by 12 sheets for $5.00 that seems steep. Help! need to make Halloween cards for Grandkids,

Reply
Crafterholic

Try using sheet protectors. They usually come in packages of 25 or 50. They are very thin like cellophane bags, but much sturdier, and acid free. You can also try binder dividers; the kind with the tabs. They come in colors as well. They are made of acetate as well as plastic. Just get creative. 😉

Reply
dontpanik

I picked up some overhead transfer sheets (Remember those) at a craft store for $1.00, but I’m guessing Officedepot or the like would have them for less than anything labeled ‘crafts’.

Reply
Misty

I found cheap transparency (for projectors) on Ebay, but I do believe they sell it at office stores.

Reply
Stargazer03

Just use those clear plastic folders. They’re really easy to find. Any stationery store.

Reply
Gloria

Hello. Just use overhead transparencies, buy off brand from Office Depot or Max.

Reply
Julie

Go to Jo Anns, they have it in the Cricut supplues. It’s a Cuddle Bug label. They have it hanging with the replacement mats for the Cricut.

Reply
cori

A company called Paper Wishes sell it.

Reply
Chan

You can use plastic that you are about to throw out, like when you buy salad in those plastic boxes..cut up and use

Reply
Helen Curtis

I got my acetate sheets form Hot Off the Press (Paper Wishes). don’t remember how much they were. I think Simon Says Stamps sells it, too.

Reply
Kristen Magee

Hi, Kelly!

Sorry to hear that you’re having problems finding acetate sheets. I purchased mine from Amazon.com. They seem to have the best prices, and there’s a lot of variety. If you search for “transparency film”, you’ll get a bunch of results.

Although I haven’t tried any of the following options myself, I’ve heard good things about using everything from the clear plastic sheets that come with some stamp sets (they’re thicker than regular acetate, so I’d be careful about cutting them with my die cutting machine) to clear clamshell packaging (also much thicker than acetate) to clear cello bags or sheets (thinner than acetate, so they’ll give you a different finished look).

Hope this helps give you some ideas!
– Kristen

Reply
Gwen Tucker

I keep my Cricut cutting board covers after the sticky boards are used up. They make great transparency sheets!

Reply
AngelaM

Excellent idea!!

Reply
rosi

I use the project life fuse tool and fuse together the 3×4 waterfall pouches. Tool can be found at Michaels when on sale for less than $20

Reply
Carmen

Is it absolutely necessary to have a die cutter? They’re so expensive and I can’t afford one. Has anyone made these without a die cutter?

Reply
Nicole

They have a ton of alternatives to a die cut machine….I enjoy making a lot by hand. There’s such a verity of punches now and stamps (I try to get as creative as I can with those)….but cricket makes a manual die cut/embosser for roughly $50 as opposed to the $200 plus of the automatic

Reply
Debbie Wells

You can also get a personal Cricut on EBay for around $60. That’s where I got mine. It’s nothing fancy, but it helps my habit.

Reply
ANN

VERY PRETTY!! EASY TOO!

Reply
sharon

thanks so much for the great ideas, I going
to Office Depot to buy my supplies, unable
to locate at Michael”s.

Reply
KIm

How about buying the clear plastic table covers that you can buy by the yard? Has anyone tried that?

Reply
Richa Maurya

Such a beutiful tutorial. I am linking it to my blog .
Thank you.
Love
Richa

Reply
Parker.O

Thank you, thank you, thank you, and a hundred more.

Reply
Susan

I buy my transparency sheets from Hunkydory. This is a UK craft company. Simplyspeicalcrafts.com sells a great variety of craft products (even though I adore Stampin Up!) at very reasonable prices. I have had many conversations with the owner and she truly loves bringing craft supplies from both the American and European market to the average (and above average) crafter. The lady’s name that owns http://www.simplyspecialcrafts.com is Debbie Hamilton. Her prices are great and she often has sales on her website. I ordered 100sheets of thick transparency for a very reasonable price. One more thing, many sites call transparency sheets acetate.

Reply
CraftyCat

I would say Debbie doesn’t carry those anymore because I just did a search and couldn’t find them. Perhaps you could share a direct link to the sheets you bought.

Reply
Any

I’m a single mum an can’t afford most of this stuff so all mine are completely hand made (look pretty rubbish but when u can’t afford you make do) I use sandwich bags for mine. Just putting it out there lol

Reply
Sue

I save the clear take out containers or containers that I have purchased food in at the store. You can usually get one or two circles/squares out of a food container that was going to be thrown away.

Reply
Denise

I just found this and it worked perfectly. Especially Method 3!

Thank you.

Reply
Heather

I have a personal laminator and I just run a sheet protector through the machine and it is perfect for this and also for pop-up boxes…in place of window cling!

Reply
Kim

Hi, I was able to purchase acetate from
an art supply store. Now not all art
supply stores sell this of course but it’s worth a try. At one store I was able to buy a more flexible acetate which you could use for both ‘Pop-up’ cards and for the window in a ‘Shaker’ card. This
was .005 Grafix acetate, I believe. The
other acetate was more ‘rigid’ but if you
have a good craft knife or circle cutter it should be no problem to cut to the
desired size/ shape.

Reply

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