Quilting Blog

Get Snuggly Soft Quilts with Fleece Backing

The back of a quilt may seem less important than the front, but don’t forget that the quilt back is what we spend most of the time snuggling! It’s for this reason that you shouldn’t feel limited to quilting cottons for your quilt backs. Lots of softer alternatives like minky quilting and fleece quilt backing can take your quilt and make it extra cozy for the chilly months.

If you’d like to give fleece quilt backing a try, here are a few examples of how to use fuzzy fabrics to back your quilts!

Fleece-backed quiltPhoto via Ever Kelly

When she made her first fleece-backed quilt, Kelly decided she was never turning back! This simple patchwork design with squares can be quilted in the ditch against a soft, black fleece backing. She didn’t use quilt batting for this picnic blanket and opted to bind the quilt using fleece from the back, which simple wraps around the raw edges.

Fleece shawlPhoto via Craftsy member Deb Cavanaugh

When it is free-motion quilted, fleece looks just as luxurious as any high-end fabric! This stunning Fleece Shawl is quilted with feathers, both large and small, in a pattern that would look stunning on any fleece quilt back.

If you want to amp up your free-motion quilting, you can try the Craftsy class Design It, Quilt It: Free-Form Techniques with Cindy Needham.

Happy 81st Birthday GrandmaPhoto via Craftsy member Debbs

If you want the soft texture of fleece on the quilt front and back, you might want to make a rag quilt! This project, titled Happy 81st Birthday Grandma, is made from large squares of fleece which are simply quilted with a large “X” pattern. Learn how to make a rag quilt with this Craftsy tutorial.

School SpiritPhoto via Craftsy member LexiBee Designs

Choose your favorite school colors and cheer on your favorite team with this modern, two-color quilt design. Back the quilt in fleece (choose a school or team fleece print for super-fans) and sew up the bonus pillowcase pattern, which is perfect for rolling up your quilt to take it with you to the big game.

Get the School Spirit pattern here.

Geometric quilt with green fleece backPhoto via Craftsy member Deena

Machine-stitch a quilt with cotton fabrics on the front and fleece on the back, using batting as normal, for an extra-plush lap quilt. The Geometric quilt with green fleece back uses a zigzag stitch along the binding to hold it in place.

Here are some tips for sewing and quilting with fleece:

1. There’s no need to pre-wash fleece fabrics, because it generally doesn’t shrink.

2. When cutting fleece, make sure to follow the nap and cut all of your pieces in the same direction. You can find the nap by running your hand over the fabric. According to Quiltbug, fleece fabrics curl to the wrong side when stretched on the crosswise grain.

3. Since it’s a bit thicker, cut through only one layer of fleece at a time.

4. Clean out your machine often when sewing with fleece, because it can deposit fuzz into your machine’s parts.

5.  When washing a finished fleece quilt, use a low-heat setting and steam to press your seams.

Check out more tips for sewing with fleece!

Do you love the look and texture of fleece quilt backing?

33 Comments

Ann Crick

I’m trying this now but having issues with the fleece puckering. Any tips on how to stop this?

Reply
L Wilt

Use quilt basting spray.

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Christal

Be sure to use a walking foot!

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Ann Crick

I’m trying this now but having issues with the fleece puckering. Any tips on how to stop this?

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Marilyn Anderson

Try a longer stitch and new needle.

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Lois Smith

Every fleece product I’ve ever wash always shrunk.

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Ursula

Pre-wash it!

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Marilyn Anderson

Also do a “test” piece.

Reply
Marilyn Anderson

Also do a “test” piece.

Reply
Marilyn Anderson

Also do a “test” piece.

Reply
Marilyn Anderson

Also do a “test” piece.

Reply
Marilyn Anderson

Also do a “test” piece.

Reply
Marilyn Anderson

Also do a “test” piece.

Reply
Marilyn Anderson

Also do a “test” piece.

Reply
Marilyn Anderson

Also do a “test” piece.

Reply
Ann Crick

I’m trying this now but having issues with the fleece puckering. Any tips on how to stop this?

Reply
Sheila

Try using a walking foot or a Teflon foot, either foot could help with the two layers feeding more evenly together during the quilting. Be sure to use basting spray before quilting.

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Marilyn Anderson

Also do a “test” piece.

Reply
Marilyn Anderson

Also do a “test” piece.

Reply
Marilyn Anderson

Also do a “test” piece.

Reply
Marilyn Anderson

Also do a “test” piece.

Reply
Marilyn Anderson

Also do a “test” piece.

Reply
Marilyn Anderson

Also do a “test” piece.

Reply
Marilyn Anderson

Also do a “test” piece.

Reply
Marilyn Anderson

Also do a “test” piece.

Reply
Marilyn Anderson

Also do a “test” piece.

Reply
Bronwyn Simpson

I used a basting spray rather than pins and it worked well.

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Linda Angyal

I too had trouble with puckering using fleece on the back with some I did before knowing about the basting spray … wish I had known then. I used preprinted panel & picture framed complimentary borders to make a pretty comfy throw with complimentary minky fleece & wrapping the back around to front for binding. Overall happy with my project.

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Marion Yarema

I call these fleece backed quilts “Couch Potato Quilts”. Love them – and have been making them this way for years! I like to bind them in the traditional fashion rather than wrap fleece to the front.

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Sue

Just tried first little quilt with fleece back and it was a disaster. All puckered. Used long stitch and basting sprAy

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Rosemary Wakegijig

I found that fleece does not last long.

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Frances Heath

Wash first, fleece and flanelette shrink lots. Dry in dryer, then iron before cutting. You won’t be dissapointed. Young people Love flanelette backing on quilts, it is cuddly.

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Christene Gutierrez

I have been using fleece for batting on small projects, got it in remnants, but my machine doesn’t like it. Needs a bigger needle and thicker thread than my cotton quilts to start with. But I would never use it for any quilt with lots of piecing that might be a family keeper, but a simple, cuddly throw would be fine. .

Reply

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