Knitting Blog

10 Ways to Knit a Sweater + The Skills You Need to Knit Them

The good news: There's more than one way you can knit a sweater. The bad news: The different types of knit sweaters can be overwhelming!

How many types of knit sweaters are there, you ask? Countless! Sweaters can be knit flat and then pieced together, knit in the round, knit from the center out, knit from sleeve to sleeve...see what I mean? Sometimes you're just not in the mood for certain techniques — seaming is always the task I dread — so it's important to know what you're getting into before you begin a new knitting pattern. Plus, if you choose a construction method you don't detest, you'll be more likely to actually complete the project.

Whether you'd like to try knitting in the round, seaming flat pieces or maybe even trying some wacky unheard-of technique, there's a construction method for you.

Here are just a few types of knit sweaters featured right here on Craftsy.

Sunset Artemisia sweater knitting pattern

Photo via Craftsy member katharina3535121

Seamless

Detest seaming as much as I do? A seamless sweater is the way to go!

Construction: Knit in the round with minimal assembly

Skills: Knitting in the round

Pattern: The Seamless Artemisia Sweater from The Seamless Artemisia Sweater class with Mercedes Tarasovich-Clark

Southold Sweater knitting pattern

Photo via Craftsy member DanielleChalson

Cuff-to-cuff

Usually reserved for more casual, laid-back styles, knitting a sweater from cuff to cuff often produces a sweater that's loose and comfortable.

Construction: Cast on at the edge of one cuff and work your way across to the opposite cuff

Skills: Knitting in the round, seaming

Pattern: Southold Sweater
Picea Cardigan knitting pattern

Photo via Craftsy member Andrea Rangel

Flat with seams

Working flat pieces is handy if you like to knit on the go, since you don't need to carry the entire sweater around in your bag! This method isn't just for cardigans; you can also knit a pullover flat, then seam it together.

Construction: Worked from the bottom up; pieces are knit flat, then seamed together at the sides and sleeves

Skills: Seaming

Pattern: Picea cardigan
Pelerine Dolman Sweater knitting pattern

Photo via Craftsy member Desert Rose

Flat in two pieces

This construction is easy, but keep in mind that it doesn't offer much shaping in the shoulders and sleeves.

Construction: Knit in two simple pieces — front and back — then seamed together at the sides and sleeves

Skills: Seaming

Pattern: Pelerine Dolman Sweater
Breakwater Sweater knitting pattern

Photo via Craftsy member Cecily G M

Top down raglan

Raglan means that the sleeves are part of the neckline, offering a pretty painless construction for those of us who don't like to seam set-in sleeves.

Construction: Worked top down and in the round in one piece

Skills: Knitting in the round

Pattern: Breakwater sweater
Simplest Sweater knitting pattern

Photo via Craftsy member jrj9

Top down yoke

The name says it all on this one! This particular top-down sweater is seamless and has pretty textured stitches on the yoke.

Construction: Knit from the top down, starting at the neck and ending at the hem

Skills: Knitting in the round

Pattern: Simplest Sweater

Dutch Cardigan knitting pattern

Photo via Craftsy member Andrea Rangel

Steeked cardigan

Sure, you could knit a cardigan flat and seam the pieces together. But if you're a fan of circular needles, try the sometimes-scary task of knitting in the round then steeking your sweater. (If you've never heard of steeking, it just means taking a pair of scissors to cut your knitting. It's not as frightening as it sounds!)

Construction: Knit in the round and then steeked to create the cardigan

Skills: Knitting in the round, having the guts to cut your knitting

Pattern: Dutch Cardigan
Fearless Child Sweater knitting pattern

 

Photo via Craftsy instructor Amy Detjen

Steeked V-neck

Steeking isn't just for cardigans. You can also simplify shaping a V-neck by knitting a sweater in the round, then cutting out the V. Amy Detjen's Simple Sweaters: Stranded & Steeked class covers the whole process, if you're interested in trying it yourself.

Construction: Knit in the round and then steeked to create the v-neck

Skills: Knitting in the round, having the guts to cut your knitting

Pattern: Fearless Child Sweater, from the Simple Sweaters: Stranded & Steeked class with Amy Detjen

Adiri Sweater knitting pattern

Photo via Craftsy member Mind of Winter

Divided at the armholes

You can avoid doing those long side seams with a sweater that's assembled like this one.

Construction: Worked in the round from the bottom to the armholes, then divided into front and back pieces that are knitted flat; sleeves are worked separately and then seamed

Skills: Knitting in the round, seaming, changing from in-the-round knitting to flat knitting

Pattern: Adiri Sweater
Rocoto sweater knitting pattern

Photo via Craftsy member saragresbach

Picked-up armhole stitches

Are you a pro at picking up stitches? This is the sweater construction method for you!

Construction: Worked in one piece from the bottom up, then stitches are picked up at the armholes for the sleeves

Skills: Knitting in the round, picking up stitches

Pattern: Rocoto

What's your favorite construction method for knitting a sweater? Are there any sweater construction methods you haven't tried yet?

5 Comments

Sylvia May Adams

interesting cut knitting done on a knitting machine then overlocked

Reply
Sylvia May Adams

interesting cut knitting done on a knitting machine then overlocked

Reply
Afolake emmanuel

How to make a sleeveless v neck cardigan

Reply
Akol Rose

How to make around neck sweater

Reply
Amanda

I want to make a v-neck sweater vest style cozy for a travel coffee mug. I’m thinking of knitting two flat pieces and seaming them, but I don’t fully understand how to create the v-neck. Any advice for a relative beginner who only uses flat needles? I’m not ready to knit in the round! Thanks for any input 🙂

Reply

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