Gardening Blog

How to Grow an Endless Supply of Ginger Indoors

Ginger is the perfect herb to grow indoors. It’s very low-maintenance, loves partial sunlight, and you can use parts of it at a time, leaving the rest in the soil to continue growing. Besides, it's delicious! Really, what's not to love about year round vegetable gardening, especially when it comes to growing ginger inside?

Ginger Pinterest

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Ginger rhizome

Photo sourced via Creative Commons from Flickr user Chrysti

A bit about ginger

Ginger takes 10 months to mature and it doesn’t tolerate frost. If you live in a place where it gets chilly in the winter, you’d be better off growing ginger in a pot indoors and bringing it outside in the summertime.

Ginger is one of those miraculous plants that grows well in partial to full shade, which makes it ideal for growing in your home, where most people don’t have full sun pouring on their windows all day long.

Little bits of the ginger root can be removed while it continues to grow. A little bit of ginger goes a long way, so these pieces can be used for cooking, brewing tea or for herbal remedies.

How to plant ginger

The best ginger to plant is purchased from a garden center or seed catalog. You’ll have much better luck if you get seed ginger that was meant to be planted. However, ginger can be hard to find from garden suppliers, especially locally.

Ginger purchased from the produce department of your local grocery store can be used to grow a plant, but with spotty results. Grocery store ginger is often sprayed with a growth inhibitor to keep it from sprouting before it’s purchased. That inhibitor also keeps it from sprouting when you stick it in a pot of soil.

Grocery store ginger also could be coated in pesticides and fungicides. The truth is, you have no idea what’s on it. I’ve heard of grocery store ginger growing just fine, and I’ve heard of it sitting in a pot forever and never budging. If you do purchase your ginger from the grocery store, be sure to soak it in water overnight to remove as much growth inhibitor as you can.

Ginger sprouting

Photo sourced via Creative Commons from Flickr user Avlxyz

Whichever way you choose to go, here are some helpful tips for growing ginger inside:

The root that you choose to plant should be plump with tight skin, not shriveled and old. It should have several eye buds on it (bumps that look like potato eyes) and if they’re already a little green, all the better.

If your root has several eye buds, it can be cut and each bud can be placed in a separate pot to produce several plants.

Be sure to pick the perfect pot!

Unlike most other houseplants, ginger loves shallow, wide pots. The roots grow horizontally so be sure the pot you choose will accommodate its growth.

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How to grow ginger indoors, step by step:

1. To start with, soak the ginger root overnight in warm water to get it ready for planting.

2. Fill your pot with very rich but well draining potting soil.

3. Stick the ginger root with the eye bud pointing up in the soil and cover it with 1-2 inches of soil. Water it well.

4. Place the ginger in a spot that stays reasonably warm and doesn’t get too much bright sunlight.

5. Keep the soil moist, using a spray bottle to mist it, or water it lightly.

6. Ginger is a slow grower, after a few weeks you should see some shoots popping up out of the soil. Continue to water the plant regularly by misting it with a spray bottle and keep it warm

Ginger Harvest

Photo sourced via Creative Commons from Flickr user Benson Kua

Harvesting ginger:

Small pieces of ginger can be harvested 3-4 months after growth begins. Pull aside some of the soil at the edges of the pot to find some rhizomes beneath the surface. Cut the needed amount off a finger at the edge of the pot and then return the soil.

Ginger can be harvested in this way endlessly, and as long as it is well cared for, it will continue to produce roots. If you need a larger harvest, you can uproot the entire plant and re-plant a few rhizomes to start the process over again.

Have you ever tried growing ginger inside? Do you have any tips to share?

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71 Comments

LadyBlanche Dubois

will this work with turmeric?

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Rico

yes it can.

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Beth

Yes it will.

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Anne

I’ve also started store-bought lemon grass with great success.

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Ruthie

Any helpful tips on growing the lemongrass? I would love to do that!

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Melissa

I cut the tops (green part) off until I have a 4-5″ piece and put that in a cup of purified water, set in indirect sunlight. Change out and top off the water as needed and it grows roots that can be planned in soil after about a month. Full sun and lots of water after that. Does well in containers outside. Not frost tolerant, but heat tolerant.

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Gardenman

Buy a plant, they’re usually small and plant it in the dirt outside after the last threat of frost and by the end of the summer good luck fitting it in a pot. I live in NH and mine will have maybe 100 beautiful stalks that are unbelievably fragrant. I pot mine for the winter and I usually have 10-20 stalks survive. The dogs will go for it as it’s the best grass around at that point. It needs lots of water due to it’s size

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Ld

experimented with lemongrass. planted them outdoors last year and they became really thick just like back home (equator). harvested and frozen all leaves before winter. mulched and covered the roots. just checked this morning and both are growing back!

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Araceli

I bought the seeds of the lemongrass. It germinated really quickly using the paper towel method. Now they’re about half an inch tall I’m keeping them in the seedling tray under the grow light for now. As for ginger I’m trying again indoors. My first attempt last summer didn’t work because of the squirrels who kept stealing it out of my pot.

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Pattie Hickey Rechtman

Yes.

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dasaratha raman

yes it will work.

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Carol

I live in the northeast, if growing ginger outside can it withstand the cold temps or do I bring in for the winter?

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Wayne

I live in MA and Ginger should not be allowed to freeze, it loves warm, partly sunny (not direct sunlight) places, that being said Ginger does best in a pot and being brought in during the winter and then moved outside during the summer months, good luck!

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Linda LeBlanc

I’ve been growing Ginger for years and live in the Deep South and have had plentiful crops of Ginger in pots as well as in the ground with no problems. Can’t wait to try turmeric.

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Nanette Rodrigurz

Excited also to try tumeric. What else can be done the same besides the ginger. I have the perfect window above my kitchen sink & in my den also. Can’t wait! Got lots of long low beautiful pots leftover from my grandmother from the 50/60/70 etc. So excited to use them!

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Marti Meyer

green onions bought from the store can be grown in water for several months. I put a bunch in about two inches of water in a pint jar. Then cut them to the top of the jar whenever you need them. They will regrow again and again. Just change the water every few days.

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Ernestina Mota

A great idea
Hoop

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Avion Bhola-Singh

Can I plant ginger or turmeric in a grocery brought roasting foil pan?

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Suzanne

I would think you could, but I haven’t tried it. I grew some ginger a long time ago for fun. It wasn’t hard. It was from the grocery store too. My son just found an old piece that started budding so I am going to try it again now 😀

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Anne

I think that would be a bit too shallow. The plant does grow roots as well as the tubers, I go to Walmart for the frosting pails (4 gallon size) and drill drainage holes around the sides near the bottom. That makes it portable. I can start indoors, bring out in spring and summer and back indoors until around Thanksgiving. I harvest when the plants leaves and stems turn yellow and lift off the plant easily. Walmart bakery department usually has plenty of pails at $1.00 each. Some local grocery stores give for free, but the availability is infrequent in our neighborhood.

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Becky

I am wanting to do this. What is a frosting pail?

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Cate

I think ” Frosting Pails ” are the containers that the Frosting/ icing comes in. ( Frosting cakes….. Nothing to do with the cold.)

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Cate

I think ” Frosting Pails ” are the containers that the Frosting/ icing comes in. ( Frosting cakes….. Nothing to do with the cold.)

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Joyce

I love ginger and can’t wait to try growing my own

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jen

I have grown ginger in a deep, wide pot in very (VERY) rich soil. I bought it from a natural grocer, said it was organic for medicinal purposes. It took months to germinate and would only send up one or two leafy shoots, then they would die off. So I began to fertilize every month and fully swap out the soil once or twice a year. It’s improved; the shoots stay healthier longer, but I think it might be too dark or too dry in my climate. Plenty warm at least. One successful note: The ginger ends up shooting roots down, then out again, so that I’ve had several layers of ginger growing in the deep pot.
Now I had consistent trouble growing Turmeric. It would grow for a while, if I was lucky, then it would shrivel up and die. I never got more than a couple of inches of a couple of shoots. Suggestions?

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rajesh khanna

hi I grow turmeric commercially in india, if your turmeric plant dries off or dies let it remain in the soil, come spring start watering it up and it shall regrow and the rhizomes shall double the next harvest. please remember to top it up with vermicompost/manure every 90 days.

if you want to go inorganic than foliar spray npk 0-0-50 every 45 days in the second year to increase the size of the rhizomes

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Marqueta Wehunt

I’ve never tried growing ginger before but I bought a small root from the grocery store and I plan to try . Maybe it will grow . I just got a green house so that should hold it through the winter . All of your comments have been helpful so thanks to all of you !

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J m

My supermarket ginger became old in the kitchen and rooted one end so I put it in a glass of water, now it is sprouting roots so I will plant it soon but keep it on the window sill where it rooted, so fingers crossed. X

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Shamim Aahraf

Valuable advices from you and all of your friends. Thanks to all. I planted 3 or 4 pieces in a wooden box 2 months ago and just today I saw two of them showing on the surface…….. no shoots, they have either grown up or moves up. What do you think, shall I scratch the soil around or leave them untouched for further 1 or 2 months.

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E J Hoffer

I’ve been growing it in a pot on a north-facing porch in the Dallas area since June. I had 3 shoots come up within 2-3 weeks but something ate them. Fortunately, it resprouted within a month and has done well as long as I keep the soil moist. I will bring it inside for the winter and harvest some for holiday cookies. I started with whole organic ginger from Whole Foods Market. If you aren’t seeing any shoots, gently pull back the soil and check if any are developing. If you don’t see any, harvest the ginger, use for cooking and start over again.

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Patti

You may have planted too deep. Ours came up in about a week and has gone crazy . We used Miracle Grow potting soil with moisture control.

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Vasanti

I have tried turmeric, it grows well in the tropical climate. This is the first time I am trying to grow it in Canada.
I used to grow turmeric for the leaves which I used to make some sweet pancake with jaggery and coconut filling and then steam them in the steamer. It gives a good aroma and tastes good.

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Jo

I grow turmeric in the uk, and it grows well in the summer, but I take it in before the frost comes, then overwinter it in the garage and leave it dormant, you won’t see it shoot then till June, a lot of friends think it has died, but you just need patience.

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Murray Kennedy-MacNeill

So I’m anxious to get started! What size pot would you suggest to start with? And then should I get larger or just stay with one pot?

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alan

just pick a place in your garden and forget about it it will grow I was given 2 boxes of ginger and planted it in sept I will pick it I may it will be young and tender

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Anna

I’m on my third attempt indoors. 1st time was a complete failure. 2nd time more successful, but the weather suddenly changed and my baby ginger died. this is my 3rd attempt (I wish I could post pictures) this time I’ve come rather far the spout is about 5-6 inches high. Here are some of my initial errors. I found that this plant needs warmth and (affection he-he) no seriously it loves heat, hence the kitchen is the best placement. I also found that you can easily over-water it, this time I did not spray it often as suggested (I was spraying 1x a week) it needs little water so I wait until it’s dry – then douse the soil with water (about 1 x a month) – also leave it alone it likes it’s privacy and will spout up and let you know – (like a cat) when it needs you. Wish me Luck – hopefully I can post pictures from infant to full growth one day – we have 9 more months = 10 months in total. Please feel free to email me regarding ginger.

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Jann

I have a plant about 10 inches tall and have sprouted four other to give away. The biggest problem I found was getting the initial sprout – probably because store-bought ginger, even if nice enough to eat, has been kicking around a while. A commentator on another blog taught me something that brought four times the sprouts on my last go-round than I had in the past. After soaking the cut ginger (each with an “eye”) in water overnight place in a bag or basket with something that gives off ripening gas – i.e. an onion, apple, maybe a pear – for a couple of days. I cut one root into 8 pieces, dried half on a window sill and half in a bag of onions. Three of the four onion treated ones sprouted, none of those from the window sill.

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Mary

Did you cut the apple or onion in half or leaven it whole. Do you think bananas give off the gas and they ripen very quickly? going to try it both ways.

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Lynda

Yes bananas also give of the ethylene gas that ripens fruit. You do not need to cut the fruit. Works great with avocados as well.

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victoria

Great tip! Thanks

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jaswant singh

what kind of temperature it requires to grow ginger indoors

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Peter Harris

I have split a ginger plant into a number of pots and they are all growing well. However, some of the shoots are now over 15 inches tall. Should I prune them?

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Anne

I would just leave it. They don’t get too much taller than that.

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filiz

I AM IN PERTH AUSTRALIA IS IT POSSIBLE TO GROW IN HORIZONTAL POT

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radioman01

In Australia they grow upside down. 🙂

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Cate

Ha Ha ……. Good one x

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Joy

Thank you for all who have contributed your experiences. I have been wanting to grow both ginger and turmeric for some time and now I’m REally eager to begin.

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Encourager

We live in a passive solar house so I guess it is best not to have the plant in a south window in the winter! However, in the summer the sun is blocked by an overhang. That should be okay???

And to put it outside – can I bury the pot up to the rim outdoors? We travel a lot in the summer and I think that is the only way it will survive…

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Myrna

can the plant be eaten, used in any recipes or just the root?

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Nancy

The buds can be pickled and used in Japanese recipes. There is a book “Asian Pickles” that has an excellent recipe. They can also be used fresh.

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Stephanie GOULD

It is best to use organic roots! The alternative is cheap, but covred in chemicas that can harm you and pollute your garden soil. I buy mine from our local organic food co-op. If you would like a recipe for homemzde fresh ginger ale, email me and I will share that info with you.

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Anna

I would love your recipe for Ginger Ale. I have tried making it before with water Kefir grains but it is hard to keep the grains alive since I am the only one who drinks it. Didn’t see your email so hope you read this.

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Paul Hardind

Hi Stephanie, I live in New Zealand and would love to try your recepie for homemzde,I love ginger ale but have never tried making it. If you dont mind sending me the recipe I would love to try it.Paul.

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Lisa

I would love your recipe for ginger ale

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Toni

Me, too! Want, that is!

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Keith

Hi Stephanie,

I googled how to grow ginger and came across your offer of how to make ginger ale. I have been making kombucha for years and would very much like your recipe for ginger ale.

Best,
Keith
( N. California)

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Mary gordon

Pr

Please send recipes for ale and other drinks

lease send recipes for ginger ale and other

Recipes for ginger drinks

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Rita McDonnell

Recipe for Ginger Ale please!!!
As a kid growing up in New Zealand everyone seemed to make their own ginger beer – I seem to remember “feeding” it yeast …. ! My email is magickiwi1@yahooDOTcom Thanks very much for recipes! 🙂

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Cate

You could google your question if no one answers.

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Paul Hardind

Hi Stephanie, I live in New Zealand and would love to try your recepie for homemzde,I love ginger ale but have never tried making it. If you dont mind sending me the recipe I would love to try it.Paul.

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ocung john

what disease attacks ginger and which herb site should be used.

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Elisa

I started a sprouting organic ginger in a tall squarish glass vase in the kitchen, immersed in water. It has been a great science experiment. Now it has shoots and roots so it really seems time to plant, but it is so cool as is. Thanks for all the info!

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Arthur turner

Hi everyone,
I live in England around East Anglia and I have read all your comments and advice. I bought my ginger root from local supermarket which was plump and had a few small shoots starting. I left these roots in a shaded position in my house for a few weeks. They now have very
Healthy shoots about 4 inches high which I will now plant up. Looks very promising. Wish me luck. Thanks all.🙂

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Sharon Franklin

I planted a small plump piece from the grocery store. Took a week for the first shoot yo cone up. So excited. Have 3 shoots coming up now and one has several leaves on it. I used half miracle-gro, half organic garden soil. Will pullnit inside for the winter and repot in a bigger pot for my patio next Spring. I looked up the full grown plants online. Beautiful! That and lemon grass will look beautiful next to each other in pots. Can hardly wait til spring.

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Bijal

Great tips folks,this is the first yr I got a good growth of ginger,one was in a wide terra cotta pot which gave a bit less than the same size sturdy plastic pot.
The best part is to eat it tender,no skin formed yet. Also the stalk is chopped and added to soups.

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Bountiful

So what is considered shallow for a POT?? Please give some diimensions? thanks! I’ve read different requirements.

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plant pots

This is great information. I learned a lot here.

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exotics lover.

Thanks for all the advice,very useful as I’ve just bought lots of ginger tubers from Homebase UK.I had been searching online,but couldn’t find any but good old DIY store had them,hurray.

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Justin

If your growing ginger inside over winter. How often should I water it? Or can I leave it on my front door step where it gets morning sun and out the way of frost. I’m in Adelaide, South Australia. Is ginger an all year round growing?

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Kevin

Does organic Ginger have the growrh inhibited spray on it? I haven’t seen an out right yes or no on that. Thanks!

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Alessandra

Thank you. A couple months ago I noticed that some of my kitchen ginger had a bulbous eye growth. For some reason I just left it growing in my ginger bowl (beside the ethylene producing fruit bowl) and it started to shoot. The shoot is about six inches tall and another is beginning to form. Yesterday I put it in a 14″ pot. My sunniest window faces SW. Is this going to be too much sun? I’ve grown cherry tomatoes in that window with great success.

Reply

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