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Photo Details:
Camera SAMSUNG SM-T530NU
Exposure Time 1/40
F-Stop 2.6
ISO 100

Created in this Craftsy Course

Flemish Master Painting Techniques taught by Andrew Conklin

Study the methods of van Eyck and Rubens to create radiant, jewel-like paintings!

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victor
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Here are some details about my project:
Category Painting
Subject Portrait
Material Acrylic Paint
Style Realist
Ly Chhun  on craftsy.com

Share a little about the materials, processes and techniques used to create this piece. Acrylic painting from reference photo. Glazing technique used. Zinc white was used for mixing skin tones. I am finding that it is drying "pasty". I minded the theory of lighting to help with the skin tones to arrive at likeness. Although this was done in acrylic, I welcome any feedback on the portrait itself. Thank you.

Ly Chhun  on craftsy.com

Is the piece for sale? No

Ly Chhun  on craftsy.com

Wow - Super job!

08/29/2014 Flag

Very nice work! I know what you mean by the zinc white drying 'pasty'. There are a few reasons for this. 1. The nature of that white, which is a pretty good substitute for lead white, but not perfect. Lead white happens to be translucent, and not all that strong in 'whiteness,' so that it makes for good color mixing for skin. Other whites, tend to be a bit stronger, and therefore can make a person look, as painters say "chalky". Since you are using acrylic, you don't' have the option of lead, which is just as well since it is a bit tricky to use. 2. When working from a photo reference, lights in the skin tend to expose much whiter than they are in real life, since the camera has a limited range of exposure compared to the way our eyes see values and colors. If you copy the photo, the lights are often forced up higher and the result is a chalky appearance. One technique, if you have to use photos, is to paint everything a bit darker, then gradually lighten.

09/02/2014 Flag

Thank you! I glazed over the painting with transparent raw sienna to get the yellow undertone back (remembering how my subjects look in real life) and painted again really trying to not add white into the shadow areas. I finished with a glossy medium to seal the painting. Also zinc white is the equivalent to lead white in acrylic. I used the opaque titanium white to do highlights. It looks a whole lot better now. Trial and error. You are absolutely right about the over exposure on the skin. But because the photo was already fixed to look a bit abstract in color, I tried to find middle between the skin tones. I am going to say that it is finished now. Thanks again. I will follow your technique more closely for the next piece I do.

09/03/2014 Flag

Excellent subject and very well captured. I hope you don't mind me saying but, I think it would have looked better without the 'sofa & curtains' in the background, as it distracts the eye from the beautiful subjects. Maybe a two-tone colour soft background would really make the subjects 'pop' right out? What do you think? Keep painting!!

10/24/2014 Flag

Looking at it now, yes, I do agree. I already gave it to my sister as a gift and she is loving it :). This was my first up close portrait. I got really excited and didn't plan too much when painting it. I will definitely keep painting! Thank you again.

10/29/2014 Flag