Pam Sews on craftsy.com

sampler The Chase reproduction 1970s kit

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Here are some details about my project:
Category Embroidery
Type Home Decor
Style Traditional, Retro / Vintage, Classic
Pam Sews on craftsy.com

What materials did you use? embroidery kit from 1970s called The Chase. It was originally worked by an 11 year old girl Mary Starkey in 1760, Newbury New England. Later on this kit was altered translating the bottom 1/3 of solid embroidery into more cross stitch. I always loved the embroidery part the best - including the woven strawberries. The outlining on the birds really makes them stand out.

Pam Sews on craftsy.com

What are you most proud of? Finally completing this after lovingly working on it for over 10 years.

Pam Sews on craftsy.com

What advice would you give someone starting this project? Consider it a labor of love and enjoy the work between your I Need This Now projects. Mary's original statement (blank lines on the sampler) were: Mary Starkey born January 9, 1799 This Sampler I wrought the year 1760 Goodness and Mercy Ever follow those who Shape there Conduct by Gods Holy Laws Mary Starkey born in Newbury New England (followed by 3 hearts) (yes, it says "there")

Pam Sews on craftsy.com

I love your work Pam, do you have a website I can follow? Email me at bendingpins (at) gmail.com

09/11/2012 Flag

I have a website, but it is new and I just can't seem to get to it... arraugh. Will email you. Thanks!

09/11/2012 Flag

I am new to Craftsy. I am not understanding . . . I found this trully beautiful pattern called The Chase, How do I order a patten or a kit? emalley@frontier.com

08/10/2013 Flag

This kit was made (see Materials comment above) in the 1970's, you would have to do an internet search to try to find another (maybe ebay?). If you do find one, you might look to see if the bottom part is solid embroidery (as this one is) or if it has been translated into cross stitch (as later kits did). Since it is a copy of an historical sampler, perhaps you might find other kits of other samplers that you would like as well! Begin with a small sampler and find a source to teach you cross stitch. I hope you find the work enjoyable as so many of us do. Good luck!

08/16/2013 Flag

Beautiful! Oh, my gosh! I have this in my stash! Patiently waiting to be rediscovered! Thank you.

08/14/2013 Flag

haha!! Well, if you don't want to work it, apparently (see comments below) you could sell it on ebay! I hope you post it if you do work it. P

08/16/2013 Flag

I have been working on this sampler off and on for ....wait for it......38 years!! I am almost through and determined to finish it by Christmas! It is one of the most difficult pieces I have ever done. (One of the birds in the center of the piece took 2 hours alone! I estimate the border alone took close to 800 hours.) Thank goodness I took breaks and did other work along the way! As I look at it now, I see a progression of skill, although I have been embroidering since I was eight, having been taught by my Grandmother who learned when she was 5. I am especially pleased with the various stitches I used in the lower part of the sampler. I used Mary Thomas's embroidery books to help me. These were printed in the 1930's and are not only excellent instruction, they are written in a cheerful, light style that is fun to read. You might try amazon.com to search for a used copy. One of the most difficult aspects of this sampler has been the fabric it was printed on. I noticed that your fabric seems to have a tight, even weave. Mine, although 100% Belgium linen, is a little more course with an uneven weave. It made the cross stitching challenging, as the weave created an uneven pattern. Oh, well...I just think of it as being more authentic to the period of Mary Starker and something that an 11-year old would produce. Can't wait to finish it with my OWN name and quote! Question: how did you wash out the residual stamping ink?

09/27/2013 Flag

I had a lot more patience than I have now and I actually split some of the linen threads with my needle since the lump was too wide for old perfectionist me. I did not remove any original stamping ink, I was lucky in that it was all covered. I did, however, take it to a professional framer who carefully "stretched" the linen by pin, threads all aligned. After that was when we discovered that the stamping was off 1 or 2 threads! I never would have noticed if he hadn't blocked it so perfectly, so be careful about how far you take this perfectionist thing :-) One tip he taught me: the mat is covered in silk and the paper backing was beveled AFTER the silk was gently peeled away from the edge - he cut the silk wider so that it could be wrapped around the new beveled edge. SO much nicer than anything I am seeing today. Be sure to use protective glass, and I'm anxious to see your quote! Congratulations on your near completion! A true labor of love.

10/04/2013 Flag

Hi there, I just purchased an unopened kit of The Chase Sampler on line. Sadly, it was missing the chart/legend to tell me which color belongs to which letter on the diagram. I can wing it, but I'd really like to find the original. Do any of you ladies have the original chart/legend that you would be willing to copy and share? I would so appreciate it. Thanks so much - Janette

09/29/2014 Flag