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Created in this Craftsy Course

Perspective in Landscape Drawing taught by Patrick Connors

Master linear perspective and learn to draw landscapes accurately using simple tools and classic techniques.

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Here are some details about my project:
Category Drawing
Type Drawing
Subject Landscape
Material Graphite
Style Plein Air
DKWoodward on craftsy.com

Share a little about the materials, processes and techniques used to create this piece. Learned a lot on this one, working many hours on it. I probably overworked it as it is only on 14 x 11 sketchbook grade paper. Bad weather (Leave it to me to take a landscape drawing class with winter approaching!) brought me inside where I set up the Albertian Veil with the reference photo taped to it (got the idea from the Lesson 5 demo of the AV and the landscape model. Don't know if this is a valid use of it). Worked with that setup until I could go back outside to the site. I used pencils #4H, 3H, 2H, HB, 2B, 4B, and 6B, trying out clutch pencils + leads for the first time (I really like the sharp point I can get with the special sharpener, which I can't seem to get on regular wooden pencils--I'm no good at using an exacto knife to sharpen those...) As suggested in the lessons, I was trying to use a variety of line-quality differences, gesture, shapes and tone to indicate depth and form. But the trees (especially the arbor vitae at left center), trunk bark, leaves, foreground changes going back and house details were tough for me. The ropes on the hammocks were too hard for me to really get them as well. Time to move on to another drawing :-) ?!

DKWoodward on craftsy.com

Hello DKWoodward, Congratulations on this wonderful drawing and all the more for making a simple subject matter captivating. Also, thank you for taking the time to give the information, comments, and impressions. In reference to your inquiry about using the A.V. on the Plan: Generally, it is not used like this; but, if it was of use, you may want to continue to do it. Also, enjoyed the perspective- and-impossible website listed in the previous post. Thank you. Now to comment on the drawing. All your long hours were well spent. The linear quality, the tonal structure, and the scale of objects as they "recede" from the eye all contribute to a convincing illusionistic space. The only concern is that the foremost hammock is placed a bit too close to the foreground. In perspective, a rule of thumb for distance from the subject matter is twice as far back as is high [or, in this case, wide]. For this drawing that would mean you would have included more of the foreground.

11/18/2013 Flag

[criticism continued] The viewer would also see the two trees trunks and bases that support the hammock. In short, do not crop your view too much, it may compromise the viewer's appreciation of the spatial structure. One small note on the black hammock ties, consider making them a bit less dark. They are the darkest things in the drawing and the eye goes to them. All in all, as mentioned before a wonderful drawing. I see that you have posted the Plan of your drawing, will comment on that soon.

11/18/2013 Flag

I so appreciate your comments and thank you very much for them. In a class lesson you said that mistakes we typically make in perception would likely reveal themselves when we review our work and/or do the plan version of our landscape drawing. Such was surely the case for me: I did see how something was amiss in the placement I made of front hammock in my composition, but I didn't understand what. You helped me so much by pointing that out in your evaluation of my scene: I was too close to that front hammock, cropping my view too much. I realize that I frequently make this same mistake in my compositions. Many thanks!

11/20/2013 Flag

This is my favorite drawing posted so far. Nice work!

12/26/2013 Flag

I really like the feeling of depth

01/01/2014 Flag