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Created in this Craftsy Course

Shooting Intimate Landscapes taught by Rob Sheppard

Turn the ordinary into the extraordinary! See beauty on a small scale and find intimate landscapes anywhere with photographer Rob Sheppard.

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Here are some details about my project:
Category Photography
Theme Nature & Landscape
Akagriff on craftsy.com

I'm working on snow and ice texture. I wanted to include the horizon to show, but maybe it's too distracting? What's your thoughts?

04/12/2014 Flag

Possibly the image would benefit from cropping to exclude the sky. There is a lot of interest in the picture without that element and it does appear out of line with the top of the frame. Hope this may help. Geoff

04/19/2014 Flag

Thanks for your comment Geoff. I agree that the horizon is not straight. I think that if I crop it out I will lose the sense of how expansive this is. This is a picture of Lake Superior. I am trying to capture an intimate landscape in a huge area. Thanks for the help. .

04/20/2014 Flag

Good for you for getting out and shooting a winter landscape. The backlight gives a great sense of texture and form. In addition, you have some nice foreground to background relationships. Cropping the top of the photo would create a different photo that would be more abstract. Your use of a small area of sky does indeed give a feeling of space. The classic intimate landscape photographer, Eliot Porter, often kept a small area of sky just for that reason. Removing the sky would flatten the photo. It is so easy to straighten photos in the computer today, however, that you really should do that. Viewers do notice and it becomes a distraction.

04/23/2014 Flag

I think the horizon is important to your image. Cropping it out would create a different scene that had less depth. But it is important to get that horizon straight, especially when it is so close to a picture's edge where a viewer really will notice.

05/02/2014 Flag