Posts by Kaz Madigan

“Handweaving is the greatest adventure in design, creativity, history and culture. It has it all.” Kaz is a longtime weaver, teacher, publisher, author and blogger on hand-weaving and all its tentacles. She recently established Curiousweaver Studio in Old Bar Beach in Australia, where she weaves and looks at yarn most of the time. She especially likes to see people enjoying and discovering the immense buzz of weaving when teaching in her studio and around Australia. Kaz loves all hand-weaving and constructed textiles and specializes in Saori freestyle weaving.

Pushing Your Reed In Weaving

two fabrics with different setts

Reeds for hand weaving come in a wide range of spacings. Now usually made from stainless steel, each of the slots or dents are spaced apart to a give you a specific sett in your woven cloth. But you’re not stuck with this number. You can use one reed for many different types of weaving projects. Read on to find out how.

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Beautiful Braids Every Weaver Should Know

woven braids

Braids are a byway of weaving. One of the many journeys weavers can go on. In amongst tying knots and intertwining yarn, we use braids to embellish our unique woven textiles. Weaving braids is addictive, puzzle-like and absorbing. Whether it’s for a trim, edge finish or a closure, braiding techniques are an essential tool in a weaver's skill box.

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Weave Exotic Fabrics With Rya Rug Knots

Image of cloth woven with rya knots on a loom

Make it knotty, lush, exotic and zesty. It is surprising how the presence of a little knotting in your weaves can make such a mood change. Create an exotic mood with your interior fabric weaves. Easy to do, the rya rug knot has enormous creative potential on your loom.

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Weaving Windows for a Lighter Cloth

Woman Wearing a Purple Woven Top If you open a window, you let the air in! You can do this in weaving too. We’re always after fabric weaving techniques that make cloth lighter and more drapeable. Who wants to wear a cardboard scarf? This technique is a really good one for both thick and fine weaving.. Read more »