Men’s Style: How to Sew a Classic Necktie in 10 Easy Steps!

Posted by on Jun 8, 2014 in Sewing | Comments


Still looking for a gift to give Dad this Father’s Day? While the gift of a tie seems rather clichéd, a hand-sewn tie transforms this conventional present into an inspired handmade gift!

Ties are relatively easy to make and can be done in no time at all. You are likely to spend more time searching for fabric and drafting the pattern than it takes to sew the tie together!

Here’s how to sew a men’s neck tie in just 10 easy steps!

Handmade Men's Tie

Making the pattern

There are plenty of commercial patterns out there for making men’s ties, but the cheapest way is to draft a pattern yourself using an old tie a tie your man no longer wears. You know what I mean: The one with those mustard stains on it that won’t come out. Or, perhaps that tie with a pattern too loud (or embarrassing) to wear? Who doesn’t have a gazillion of those? Well, that’s what I did. I simply disassembled one, drafted a workable pattern from it and was on my way.

Budget-friendly tip: If you don’t’ have an old tie handy, head over to a local thrift store, where you can usually locate a pile of used ties that’ll probably cost you less than $1!

A standard tie is typically 57″ long and approximately 3 ½” wide at its widest point. The tie is comprised of a base fabric, a bit of lining material at the tips and an interlining. The sky is the limit on what fabric to use for the base: Just don’t pick anything too sheer.

The lining material is what shows underneath the tips of the ties at the front and back. Referred to as the tipping, you can select something that will contrast with the base fabric, choose regular lining material or perhaps even use the same fabric as the base. As for the interlining material, select a sew-in product, preferably wool. Something of medium weight and that has a bit of spring or loft to it. Or, do what I did, and simply use the interlining from the disassembled tied.

You will need:

  • Cardboard or craft paper for drafting the pattern
  • Straight edge ruler
  • Marking pen/pencil
  • Rotary cutter or very sharp long shears
  • Silk pins
  • Needle for hand sewing
  • ¾ yards of fabric for the tie base, 45″ or 60″ wide
  • ¼ yard of lining material
  • 1 ¼ yard of medium weight sew-in interfacing
  • Matching thread

Directions:

1. Draft the pattern by tracing the outline of the old tie pieces onto any kind of paper. I prefer the weight of craft paper. Ties are cut on the bias so pay attention to the grainline.

Old Tie Disassembled

2. Lay out the pattern pieces, pin in place and cut out with either shears or a rotary cutter.

Tie Pattern Pieces

3. Join the three sections, using ¼” seam allowances, to form the base of the tie.

Join the three sections

4. Cut out the lining sections to form the tips.

Cut the lining

5. Attach the lining to each tip end by first folding the tie ends in half and then stitching the tip closed roughly ¼” from the tip end.

Attach lining

6. Stitch the lining sides to the tie ends using ¼” seam allowances and stitch to — but not over — the tip stitching.

Stitch the lining sides

7. Carefully turn the tie point right side out and press in place. The lining edges should set back slightly from the tie point as shown above.

Press tie seams in place

8. Now, lay the interlining (I used the one from the old tie — so much easier) along the center of the entire length of the tie. The end points should fit snugly into the tips at both ends.

Tip tucked under lining 9

9. Press the bottom edge up by about ⅜” and press in place. Now fold the top edge down towards the center and pin in place. Fold up the bottom edge towards the center and pin that in place.

Pining the edges

Pining the tie edges in place

10. Hand stitch the folded edge to the center of the tie. Begin by sewing a bar tack and then stitch the length of the tie with a slip stitch. Stitch only through the interlining and not through to the base fabric. Finish with a bar tack at the opposite end.

Finishing your hand-sewn men's tie

Now, very lightly press to set stitches being careful not to flatten the edges.

There you have it! Your very own men’s necktie!

Loved getting to draft your own pattern for this project? You can learn more about patternmaking in Craftsy’s collection of design & patternmaking classes. Be sure to check out Pattern Drafting from Ready-to-Wear: a classic class that no creative sewer should miss!

What type of fabric will you use for your handmade necktie?

Comments

  1. Used to make neckties for my husband and my sewing clients. The first one was difficult but once you get the hang of making them, they go real fast! Excellent tutorial and with the cost of ties being what they are these days, they are excellent gifts or boutique items!

  2. Thanks to give me practisch ideas, now I try to make a tie.