Crochet Thursday: 3 Ways to Weave In Ends

When you finish your crochet project, it’s hard not to get excited and just kind of, um, snip off those ends. Resist the urge! If you want your piece to last a long time — and look professional — you need to properly weave in those yarn ends.

It’s easy to weave in your ends. It’s so easy, in fact, that the task can actually get a little tedious. I like to weave in my crochet ends while I watch a movie or listen to an audiobook.

While weaving in ends doesn’t take a lot of time or concentration, you need to do it the correct way in order to make sure the ends don’t poke out or unravel. And how you do it can depend on a lot of things, from what type of crochet stitch you’re using to whether your project has seams or not.

Grab your tapestry needle and test these three options for weaving in your crochet ends!

Weave yarn ends through the stitches

1. Weave through the stitches

Run that needle through a couple stitches, change directions and run it vertically, then weave it in the opposite direction. Going up and down and side to side will help to lock that baby in. Remember to always weave on the wrong side of the work. If you’re working with something like a scarf that doesn’t have a wrong side, just do your best to hide the ends as much as possible.

Weave in ends with a whipstitch - Craftsy.com

2. Whipstitch the stitches

Whipstitch around the stitches on the wrong side of the work. I’ve used pink yarn above to show you how that whipstitch looks. Normally, of course, you’d use the same color yarn when you’re weaving. Use the same technique as you would if you were weaving right into the stitches, changing directions to secure the end as much as possible.

3. Weave as you crochet

Double up your yarn and take the loose end with you as you crochet. This works well if you’re crocheting with the same color. (Carrying a pink yarn with a yellow yarn might look awesome, but I doubt it’s the look you’re going for!) It’s also a relief to finish a project and have most of the ends already taken care of.

General tips for weaving in ends

  • Sometimes, I like to pull my end taut, snip it off, and then let it spring back into the stitches just to make sure it’s really hidden in there — and because I don’t want to risk cutting too close to the piece. Could you imagine accidentally cutting the project? Heart attack.
  • Remember to weave the ends in before you block. This makes doubly sure that everything stays in place and keeps its shape after blocking.
  • If your piece has seams in it, use them to your advantage. Weave the yarn in and out of the seam, where it’s guaranteed that no one will ever spot it.

Of course, weaving in ends is one of many basic crochet how-tos a beginner needs to be familiar with. If you need even more basic help — or just a refresher — check out Vickie Howell’s Crochet Lab class. Vickie will walk you through all the basic stitches, including crocheting granny squares and a techie cozy. (These things sound much more exciting than weaving in ends, don’t you think?)

If you’re a knitter, you can also get some tips for weaving in your knit stitches.

Be sure to come back to the Craftsy blog tomorrow for a special holiday installment of Free Pattern Friday!

How do you weave in your crochet ends? Any tips to share?

7 Comments

Cheri Lavigne Perry

I have a question I’m trying to get answered about weaving ends in…..I weave my ends in and they are nice and tight but the ends still pop their little ends out. How do you keep this from happening? Is there a type of soft glue or something that would help hold them? I was thinking of the ‘Stop Freying’ glue used by sewers maybe but I’ve never used it and don’t know if it would leave stiff spots where it is applied.
Do you have any suggestions?

Reply
Lorraine Moale

I am having the same problem with the ends. Did you come up with an answer?

Reply
Cheri Lavigne Perry

I have a question I’m trying to get answered about weaving ends in…..I weave my ends in and they are nice and tight but the ends still pop their little ends out. How do you keep this from happening? Is there a type of soft glue or something that would help hold them? I was thinking of the ‘Stop Freying’ glue used by sewers maybe but I’ve never used it and don’t know if it would leave stiff spots where it is applied.
Do you have any suggestions?

Reply
Rhonda Abernathy

Possibly try using that glue on a swatch…a sample swatch and see if it leaves a hard spot.

Reply
GrandmaLinda

Your question is difficult to answer because a person reading your question has no idea how you wove them in to begin with. There are various ways to weave ends in. I would suggest checking out a few videos on YouTube. For example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oyvdsTz9Jso
After you’ve done the weaving, pull out the tail a bit and cut. Then stretch your work a bit. The tail should recede into the work. The yarn is also a factor. Some yarns are more difficult to weave in, such as cotton, or the silkier yarns, such as Caron’s Simply Soft.

Reply
Jyudy

Guess I have the same problem as all the others. I have an afghan (12 rnd granny squares) that is on my bed.’s only a year old & yet there are ends popping out all over. With that afghan, I wove under the stitches. I’m experienced at crochet yet this give me so much problem & frustration. I’ve been doing baby blankets for a lady that ordered 4. I’m almost finished with #3 & she doesn’t need it until Aug. The last one is due in Oct. so I have plenty of time but every time I weave in the ends I wonder if they will stay.

Reply
Charlotte

I always weave in in 3 differnt directions to prevent unraveling (a thread can never be pulled in 3 different directions at once). For instance, if I go to the left, I go up or down and then to the right. I haven’t had trouble with unraveling so far. I read the tip somewhere once, but I forgot where

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