5 Crochet Edges You Should Know

Your choice of crochet edge can make or break your design. Leaving an edge unfinished is not the end of the world, but if you really want your project to soar, choosing an appropriate finishing stitch can really take it over the edge!

Crochet Edge Pinterest

An edge is worked directly on a piece of crochet, unlike a trim, which is worked separately then attached into position on the fabric (crocheted or not).

Close Up of Blocks or leaning DC clusters

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Here are a few of the most common crochet edge stitches you can use.

I suggest memorizing them, so when you get to the end of a project, you already have a few ideas on how to complete it. You can download and print these patterns here.

Along with how to complete the stitches, I have included a suggested number of stitches they can be worked on. If you find your last row has fewer stitches than called for, make an evenly spaced increase row. Fortunately, most of these are worked over a small number of stitches, so your increase row will likely not warp the shape of your fabric.

Crocheting a row of single crochet is suggested before you start an edge pattern so you can work on an even line, especially if you are working a side!

Crab stitch

Close up of Crab Stitch/ Corded Edging

The crab stitch is utilized as a corded edging. It’s a subtle and sophisticated finish that will be the easiest to memorize and use.

Worked over: any number of stitches
Finish it: Work an odd number of rows (at least one) of single crochet. At the end, do not turn — CH 1, skip the stitch directly to the RIGHT and reverse single crochet (rev SC*) into each SC, ending with a sl  st in the turning chain of the previous row. Fasten off.

Worked in the round: sl st into first SC, Ch 1, then continue as for working flat, ending with a slst into first rev SC.

*rev SC (worked from left to right): Insert hook in next stitch to the right, yarn over, pull loop through, yarn over, pull through both loops on hook.

Get a downloadable, printable version of this pattern »

Shell edging

Close Up of Shell edging or Scallops
Shell edging: worked after one row of contrasting SC.

Shells will give you a more dainty looking finish. The scallops create an air of girlish charm. It’s beautiful on blankets and garments alike.

Worked over: multiple of 4 stitches + 1
Finish it: Ch 1, SC in first st, *skip 1 st, 5 DC in next st, skip 1 st, 1 SC in next st; Rep from * to end, SC in last st (or turning ch, if you work in the turning chains). Fasten off.

Get a downloadable, printable version of this pattern »

Picot edging

Close Up of Picot edging
Picot edging: 3 chain picots with two stitches between each.

I like using picots when I want a decorative edge that’s not going to outshine the pattern. This really simple edge uses only single crochet and chains.

Worked over: Any number of stitches, depending on how you want to space the bumps (picots).
Finish it: Treat this like a row of SC. After the first stitch, Ch 3, 4, or 5 and slst into first ch (picot made!). Work two, three, or four stitches, then make another picot. Continue working as such, ending with a picot over the second to last SC.

Get a downloadable, printable version of this pattern »

Block edging

Close Up of Blocks or leaning DC clusters

I like to call these “leaning DC groups.” I sometimes used them in my patterns, but they make a pretty interesting edge. If you want to put them in a pattern, your next row can be made by crocheting into the corners of each little block and chaining to get to the next.

Worked over: Multiple of 4 stitches + 3
Finish it: Ch 3, skip first 3 stitches, *1 DC in next st, Ch 3, 3 DC around the post of the DC, skip next 3 stitches; Rep from * to last 3 stitches, Ch 3, slst in last stitch or turning chain of previous row.

Worked in the round: Ch 6, DC in 4th ch from hook, DC in next ch, 2 DC in first ch, skip next 3 stitches, * 1 DC in next st, Ch 3, 4 DC around the post of the DC, skip next 3 stitches; Rep from * around, slst into third chain of beg-ch.

Get a downloadable, printable version of this pattern »

Blanket edging

Close Up of Blanket Edge or Spike Stitch

This stitch is called the blanket edge because it resembles the blanket stitch in embroidery. It’s a simple stitch that looks best in a contrasting color.

Worked over: Any number of stitches.
Finish it: This stitch utilizes the spike SC. Space them to suit the number of stitches you have in the row or round.

For example (multiple of 4 stitches + 3):
Ch 1, SC in first 3 stitches, *1 SC in next stitch by inserting your hook about 1/4″ below the edge, 1 SC in each of the next 3 stitches; Rep from * to end. Fasten off. You can make the spikes longer by inserting your hook lower in the main piece.

Get a downloadable, printable version of this pattern »

Save & Print These Crochet Edging Stitches Patterns

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Download and print the patterns for these common crochet borders stitches so you can use them on any project.Download the FREE Guide »

16 Comments

Jan Yost

So helpful but site would not let me save the info…
Really like the small swatches.
Thank You

Reply
Cherrylmaree

Hi Jan, I just used ‘copy’ and ‘paste’. That worked nicely.

Reply
Bindhurani

I use the shell edging for variety of projects. The crab stitch, I was thinking about refreshing. The blanket edging is cute. I may use it for an upcoming blanket.

Reply
Monica Morris

I was in desperate need of a cute border for a baby blanket I was making for my newborn granddaughter. The Shell Edging was perfect. It looks absolutely adorable! Thank you!

Reply
Monica Morris

I was in desperate need of a cute border for a baby blanket I was making for my newborn granddaughter. The Shell Edging was perfect. It looks absolutely adorable! Thank you!

Reply
Monica Morris

I was in desperate need of a cute border for a baby blanket I was making for my newborn granddaughter. The Shell Edging was perfect. It looks absolutely adorable! Thank you!

Reply
Geri

Hey natalie

I believe “worked over” means working across a row, TURNING, then working back across that row. Repeat. It’s a technique otherwise known as “working in rows” whereas “working in the round” (doilies, oval tablecloths, toques etc), your starting chain is joined to make a circle and you then work into each stitch around that circle. Be careful not to unintentionally twist the circle!
I just crocheted a stroller blanket and used the Block edging to give it a lovely finish. Thank you Lisa!

Reply
Kathy Ernst

Thanks so much for the ideas !! I needed a border for my Great-Granddaughers baby blanket.
One of these should look great on the blanket.

Reply
Sandra

I’m in the process of making my 11 year old grandson a blanket for his bed. I really wanted an edge that wasn’t girly & have just spotted the blanket edge. Can’t wait to give it a go. Thank you.

Reply
Mary Ellen

I really love the block edging. I am somewhat newer to crochet. Would i use the instructions for crochet in a round if I want to put an edging on a blanket of granny squares??

Reply
Sara

If you want to go all the way around your project with a seamless edge/border, work in the round. If you’re only doing one or two sides, work in rows.

Reply
amateur

What’s a good border for a “small shell” patterned baby blanket? The top (shell) is fine, but the sides/bottom need finishing. thx

Reply
Yolanda

I need a border for my shell stitched baby blanket on the sides and bottom of the blanket

Reply
Dolly

Christy I am a volunteer for Lynus Blankets and we are always looking for new edgings the ones you show here are really nice and easy Thank You for your help

Reply
Colene Schmitt

I made a baby blanket and I need a trim pattern to put around the edge of the blanket.n. Thank You

Reply

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