Celebrate Knit in Public Week with 10 Knitting Facts You Might Not Know

Posted by on Jun 11, 2013 in Knitting | Comments


knit in public week

Now that you’ve been prepared for Knit in Public Week with this infographic, don’t forget to celebrate! Explore all of your options here. Then get outside and knit, but before you go, do you know these facts about knitting?

1.Did you know these celebrities knit? 

  • Joan Crawford
  • Elizabeth Taylor
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
  • Julia Roberts
  • Cameron Diaz
  • Dakota Fanning
  • Winona Ryder

 

2. Did you know these literary characters knit? 

  • Molly Weasley of the Harry Potter series
  • Princess Eliza from the Hans Christian story “The Wild Swans”
  • Madame Defarge from A Tale of Two Cities
  • Ma Ingalls from the Little House series
  • Miss Marple from Agatha Christie’s mysteries

 

3. When did knitting originate?

Knitted socks discovered in Egyptian tombs have been dated between the 3rd and 6th centuries AD.

 

4. Did you know knitting is good for you?

It can create a relaxation response in the body which can decrease blood pressure, heart rate, help prevent illness, and have a calming effect.

 

5. When did yarn bombing begin?

As early as May 2004 in Den Helder, Netherlands.

 

6. Who’s the world’s fastest knitter?

Hazel Tindall from Shetland, achieved 262 stitches in three minutes on 16th February 2008.

 

7. How many people have ever knitted at the same time?

3,083 people broke the record for the most people knitting simultaneously for fifteen minutes in Royal Albert Hall, London in September 2012.

 

8. Have you heard about mega knitting?

Mega knitting is a term recently coined. It uses the same stitches and techniques as conventional knitting, except that hooks are carved into the ends of large gauge needles.

 

9. What were early knitting needles made from?

Early knitting needles were usually made from bone, ivory or tortoise shell.

 

10. When did World Wide Knit in Public Day begin?

It started in 2005.

 

Ready to participate? Download the free Craftsy Knitting and Crochet Patterns App to find your knitting project and enjoy it on-the-go all week long.

Comments

  1. Susan says:

    If hooks are carved into large gauge needles doesn’t that make them crochet hooks?

    1. Starr says:

      I agree, it sounds like Tunisian crochet hooks to me.

  2. Mary Bacskai says:

    AWESOME TALENTS CREATING DAILY, I SEE. TY/.<3