Eye Candy: Unique Quilts

Posted by on Apr 12, 2013 in Quilting | Comments


What most of us love about quilting is the uniqueness of each handmade project. No two quilters produce the same results, and each finished quilt holds a story in its fibers! Going beyond the expected, these unique quilts are truly remarkable in their innovation, from the process used in making the quilt to the attention-grabbing end project.

This Portrait Quilt by Shruti of 13 Woodhouse Road uses 15 shades of grey solid fabric and raw edge applique fused to her quilt top. She estimates that she fused more than 3,400 pieces to put together the designs in the face! The quilt honors a grandfather who started her family’s business more than 100 years ago.

 

A Very Long Conversation by Rossie Hutchinson and quilted by Bernie Olszewski is based on a simple yet effective quilt block, repeated across several rows. She says the quilt was made for a friend who never stops talking, so the speech bubbles were mean to be a loving joke, but also symbolic of a relationship as one “long conversation.” Rossie shares a tutorial for making the unique quilt blocks on her blog.

 

The 50-Inch Round Butterfly quilt by Arlene C uses a special wedge ruler to achieve a circular quilt pattern, which is unique and unexpected. Pieced with batiks, this unique quilt design shows a great amount of texture and would make a perfect outdoor throw quilt or picnic blanket for spring.

 

The Broken Diamonds quilt by Kati Spencer of From the Blue Chair was inspired by an art print and the traditional log cabin block. Instead of constructing log cabins and slicing them, however, Kati unexpectedly paper-pieced quarter triangles. She says this gave her the precise look she was going for with no repeated block halves. The spiral quilting adds softness to the hard angles of this unique quilt.

 

Impracticality is a unique quilt pieced and quilted by Craftsy instructor Angela Walters. She says that this is one of the few quilts she’s made for herself and her first improv-pieced project. “I named the quilt ‘Impracticality’ because every part of it was impractical. It wasted too much fabric, took too long to piece and too long to quilt. The whole time I was working on it, I kept saying to myself, this is so impractical, but I am so glad that I did it.” The clipped corner and detailed free-motion quilting adds individuality to this project. She teaches many of her design techniques in the Crafty course Machine Quilting Negative Space.

 

These stunning curves appear to be pieced, but they are actually printed! The 2+2 quilt by Colleen Wootton is her original design printed onto fabric and quilted as a whole-cloth quilt. The minimalist design and simple solids make this a unique quilt that draws the viewer in. Whole-cloth quilts expert Cindy Needham teaches more about this technique in her Craftsy course Design It, Quilt It.

 

What’s the one thing about a quilt that first catches your eye—the unique construction, the fabrics or the quilting?

In case you missed it, you might enjoy scrap quilting patterns and machine quilting patterns. Come on back to the Craftsy blog tomorrow to learn about the ancient art of batik!